Research

7 Science-Backed Reasons Why Generosity Is Good for Your Health

December 1, 2013

Alexander Stewart of the School of Arts and Sciences is quoted about his collaborative research on generosity with Joshua Plotkin of SAS and the School of Engineering and Applied Science.

Article Source: Huffington Post
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Media Contact:Holly Auer | holly.auer@uphs.upenn.edu | 215-349-5659November 29, 2013

Penn Medicine Study Examines Use of Yoga to Lessen Side Effects of Prostate Cancer Treatment

A new, first-of-its-kind study by researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania seeks to learn whether men with prostate cancer who are undergoing radiation therapy can benefit from yoga.

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Media Contact:Evan Lerner | elerner@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604November 28, 2013

Memories Are ‘Geotagged’ With Spatial Information, Penn Researchers Say

Using a video game in which people navigate through a virtual town delivering objects to specific locations, a team of neuroscientists from the University of Pennsylvania and Freiburg University has discovered how brain cells that encode spatial information form “geotags” for specific memories and are activated immediately before those memories are recalled.

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Media Contact:Evan Lerner | elerner@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604November 26, 2013

Penn Science Café: Squid Camouflage

blurb: 
Alison Sweeney has a Ph.D. in biology, yet is a member of Penn’s Department of Physics and Astronomy. What is a physicist doing studying giant clams and exotic squid? Her research is focused on photonic structures found in these creatures that give them unique and surprising abilities.

WHO:            Alison Sweeney
                     Assistant Professor of Physics

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Media Contact:Evan Lerner | elerner@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604November 25, 2013

Researchers at Penn Uncover Mechanism Behind Blood Stem Cells’ Longevity

The blood stem cells that live in bone marrow are at the top of a complex family tree. Such stem cells split and divide down various pathways that ultimately produce red cells, white cells and platelets.

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Media Contact:Katherine Unger Baillie | kbaillie@upenn.edu | 215-898-9194
Media Contact:Karen Kreeger | karen.kreeger@uphs.upenn.edu | 215-349-5658 November 25, 2013

Five Penn Faculty Earn Distinction as AAAS Fellows

blurb: 
Five faculty members from the University of Pennsylvania have been named fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

Five faculty members from the University of Pennsylvania have been named fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

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Media Contact:Evan Lerner | elerner@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604November 19, 2013

Penn’s AppItUP Challenge Will Culminate With Launch of Five New Companies

blurb: 
In the AppItUP Challenge, faculty and staff are encourage to submit their ideas for mobile applications, which are then judged by a panel of venture capital partners. The top ten ideas then go on to a public event, where development partners bid for the opportunity to turn the ideas into functional prototypes.

WHO:              Anthony H. Williams
                       Pennsylvania State Senator

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Media Contact:Evan Lerner | elerner@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604November 14, 2013

Penn Produces Graphene Nanoribbons With Nanopores for Fast DNA Sequencing

The instructions for building all of the body’s proteins are contained in a person’s DNA, a string of chemicals that, if unwound and strung end to end, would form a sentence 3 billion letters long.

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Media Contact:Steve Graff | stephen.graff@uphs.upenn.edu | 215-349-5653November 11, 2013

Penn Medicine: APOL1 Gene Speeds Kidney Disease Progression and Failure in Blacks, Regardless of Diabetes Status

A large study co-led by Penn Medicine published this week in the New England Journal of Medicine found that African Americans with the APOL1 gene variant experience faster progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and have a significantly increased risk of kidney failure, regardless of their diabetes status.

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Media Contact:Kim Menard | Kim.Menard@uphs.upenn.edu | 215-662-6183November 11, 2013

Penn Medicine Researchers Identify First Genetic Mutations Linked to Persistent Atopic Dermatitis in African-American Children

Two specific genetic variations in people of African descent are responsible for persistent atopic dermatitis (AD), an itchy, inflammatory form of the skin disorder eczema.