Research

Study: Middle-Class Students are Better at Asking for Academic Help

December 7, 2011

Doctoral candidate Jessica McCrory Calarco of the School of Arts and Sciences is cited for her research about middle-class students who ask for more help from teachers than their working-class classmates.

Article Source: Education Week
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Media Contact:Evan Lerner | elerner@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604December 13, 2011

Penn Engineers Develop More Effective MRI Contrast Agent for Cancer Detection

Many imaging technologies and their contrast agents — chemicals used during scans to help detect tumors and other problems — involve exposure to radiation or heavy metals, which present potential health risks to patients and limit the ways they can be applied. In an effort to mitigate these drawbacks, new research from University of Pennsylvania engineers shows a way to coat an iron-based contrast agent so that it only interacts with the acidic environment of tumors, making it safer, cheaper and more effective than existing alternatives.

Middle-Class Students Ask for More Help Than Working-Class Peers, Create Own Advantages

December 7, 2011

Doctoral candidate Jessica McCrory Calarco of the School of Arts and Sciences is cited for her research about middle-class students who ask for more help from teachers than their working-class classmates.

Article Source: Huffington Post

Top 10 New Findings in Parenting

December 7, 2011

Jennifer Pinto-Martin of the School of Nursing comments on a study that found that small babies have a bigger risk of autism.

Article Source: Time

Researchers: Medical Procedure for Breast Cancer Lacks Benefits

December 7, 2011

Robert Prosnitz of the Perelman School of Medicine finds that a contralateral prophylactic mastectomy lacks significant benefits for breast cancer patients.

Article Source: NBC Philadelphia

Intelligence in the Age of Smartphones

December 7, 2011

Keith Hampton of the Annenberg School for Communication is cited for leading a national survey regarding social networking and how it affects our lives.

Article Source: Huffington Post
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Media Contact:Evan Lerner | elerner@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604December 5, 2011

Penn Geneticists Help Show Bitter Taste Perception Is Not Just About Flavors

PHILADELPHIA — Long the bane of picky eaters everywhere, broccoli’s taste is not just a matter of having a cultured palate; some people can easily taste a bitter compound in the vegetable that others have difficulty detecting. Now a team of Penn researchers has helped uncover the evolutionary history of one of the genes responsible for this trait. Beyond showing the ancient origins of the gene, the researchers discovered something unexpected: something other than taste must have driven its evolution.

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Media Contact:Jill DiSanto | jdisanto@upenn.edu | 215-898-4820December 2, 2011

Penn Center for High Impact Philanthropy's 10 Effective Holiday Charitable Giving Tips

PHILADELPHIA — Each holiday season, people are moved by the spirit of giving to make a difference in the lives of others.  The Center for High Impact Philanthropy at the University of Pennsylvania School of Social Policy & Practice has developed an online guide that lists high-impact, low-cost charitable-giving opportunities for donors interested in making a difference with “High Impact Holiday Giving.”

Inquirer Editorial: City Is Attacking Crime by Removing Grime

December 2, 2011

Charles Branas and Eugenia Garvin of the PerelmanSchool of Medicine are spotlighted for their research on the effect of greening vacant lots.

Article Source: Philadelphia Inquirer
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Media Contact:Evan Lerner | elerner@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604November 30, 2011

Penn and Brown Researchers Demonstrate Earthquake Friction Effect at the Nanoscale

PHILADELPHIA — Earthquakes are some of the most daunting natural disasters that scientists try to analyze. Though the earth’s major fault lines are well known, there is little scientists can do to predict when an earthquake will occur or how strong it will be. And, though earthquakes involve millions of tons of rock, a team of University of Pennsylvania and Brown University researchers has helped discover an aspect of friction on the nanoscale that may lead to a better understanding of the disasters.