Health & Medicine

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Media Contact:Lee-Ann Donegan | leeann.donegan@uphs.upenn.edu | 215-349-5660March 20, 2015

Penn Medicine Researchers Pinpoint Potential New Drug Target for Protection against Certain Neurodegenerative Diseases

Penn Medicine researchers have discovered that hypermethylation - the epigenetic ability to turn down or turn off a bad gene implicated in 10 to 30 percent of patients with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) and Frontotemporal Degeneration (FTD) - serves as a protective barrier inhibiting the development of these diseases.  Their work, published this month in Neurology, may suggest a neuroprotective target for drug discovery efforts.

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Media Contact:Greg Richter | gregory.richter@uphs.upenn.edu | 215-614-1937March 19, 2015

Penn Medicine Study Finds Being Near Greened Vacant Lots Lowers Heart Rates

Greening vacant lots may be associated with biologic reductions in stress, according to a new study from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. Residents who walked near newly greened vacant lots had significantly lower heart rates compared to walking near a blighted, or neglected, vacant lot.

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Media Contact:Karen Kreeger | karen.kreeger@uphs.upenn.edu | 215-349-5658March 19, 2015

Penn Researchers Describe New Approach to Promote Regeneration of Heart Tissue

The heart tissue of mammals has limited capacity to regenerate after an injury such as a heart attack, in part due to the inability to reactivate a cardiac muscle cell and proliferation program. Recent studies have indicated a low level of cardiac muscle cell (cardiomyocytes) proliferation in adult mammals, but it is insufficient to repair damaged hearts.

HUP Doctors and Traumatic Brain Injury Patients Compare Notes on Treatment and Recovery

March 13, 2015

Douglas Smith of the Perelman School of Medicine suggests the best way for medical professionals to help traumatic brai

Article Source: CBS News (Philadelphia)
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Media Contact:Katherine Unger Baillie | kbaillie@upenn.edu | 215-898-9194March 16, 2015
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Media Contact:Katherine Unger Baillie | kbaillie@upenn.edu | 215-898-9194March 16, 2015

Penn Vet Team Points to New Colon Cancer Culprit

blurb: 
Colon cancer is a heavily studied disease — and for good reason. It is one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths worldwide, and its numbers are on the rise, from 500,00 deaths in 1990 to 700,000 in 2010. This growth comes despite scientists’ ever-increasing knowledge of the genetic mutations that initiate and drive this disease. Now, a team of researchers from the University of Pennsylvania has found evidence of a new culprit in the disease, a protein called MSI2.

Colon cancer is a heavily studied disease — and for good reason. It is one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths worldwide, and its numbers are on the rise, from 500,000 deaths in 1990 to 700,000 in 2010.

Audio: A Stunning Cancer Recovery Inspires New Research

March 12, 2015

Andy MinnRobert Vonderheide and 

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Media Contact:Lee-Ann Donegan | leeann.donegan@uphs.upenn.edu | 215-349-5660March 5, 2015

Penn Medicine Analysis Shows that One-Third of Americans Do Not Have Access to Stroke Center Within One Hour

Stroke is one of the leading causes of death and disability in the United States, but access to rapid EMS care and appropriate stroke care centers with the ability to deliver acute stroke therapies can drastically mitigate the debilitating effects of a stroke. A population-based approach to health planning would prevent disparities in access to specialized stroke care, says new Penn Medicine research.

Audio: Penn Trial Suggests ‘Triple Threat’ for Melanoma Patients Could Be Effective

March 9, 2015

Lynn Schuchter of the Perelman School of Medicine discusses the results of a clinical trial that introduces a “triple t

Protection Without a Vaccine

March 9, 2015

Philip Johnson and James Wilson of the Perelman School of Me

Article Source: New York Times