Health & Medicine

6
facebook twitter google print email
Media Contact:Karen Kreeger | karen.kreeger@uphs.upenn.edu | 215-349-5658April 20, 2015

Messenger RNA-associated Protein Drives Multiple Paths in T-cell Development, Penn Study Finds

RNA is both the bridge between DNA and the production of proteins that carry out the functions of life and what guides which and how much protein gets made.

facebook twitter google print email
Media Contact:Karen Kreeger | karen.kreeger@uphs.upenn.edu | 215-349-5658April 16, 2015

Penn Study Describes First Steps in Basic Biological Process

Understanding the molecular signals that guide early cells in the embryo to develop into different types of organs provides insight into how tissues regenerate and repair themselves.

facebook twitter google print email
Media Contact:Evan Lerner | elerner@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604April 15, 2015

Mentally Stepping Back From Problems Helps Youth Deal With Negative Emotions, Penn Study Says

Adolescence is a time of frequent and intense emotional experiences, but some youth handle their emotions better than others. Why do some young people react adaptively while others ruminate?

facebook twitter google print email
Media Contact:Evan Lerner | elerner@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604April 15, 2015

Penn Senior Adrian Lievano to Tackle Water Security in Kenya

blurb: 
Building prosthetic limbs and developing rain-water filtration systems may seem like they have nothing in common. But to Adrian Lievano, a University of Pennsylvania senior from Miami majoring in mechanical engineering and applied mechanics, there’s a synergy: In both cases, the user is the designer’s top priority.

By Madeleine Stone @themadstone       

(This is the second in a series of features introducing the inaugural Penn President’s Engagement Prize winners.)  

facebook twitter google print email
Media Contact:Anna Duerr | anna.duerr@uphs.upenn.edu | 215-349-8369April 13, 2015

Penn Medicine Pain Management Study Reveals Patient Confusion about Opioid Addiction

Emergency department patients have misperceptions about opioid dependence and want more information about their pain management options, according to a new study from researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.

facebook twitter google print email
Media Contact:Ron Ozio | ozio@upenn.edu | 215-898-8658 April 14, 2015

Donita Brady Appointed Presidential Professor at Penn

Donita Brady has been named the seventh Presidential Professor at the University of Pennsylvania, effective July 1.  She will be Presidential Assistant Professor of Cancer Biology in Penn’s Perelman School of Medicine.

facebook twitter google print email
Media Contact:Karen Kreeger | karen.kreeger@uphs.upenn.edu | 215-349-5658April 13, 2015

Limber Lungs: One Type of Airway Cell Can Regenerate Another Lung Cell Type

A new collaborative study describes a way that lung tissue can regenerate after injury. The team found that lung tissue has more dexterity in repairing tissue than once thought.

facebook twitter google print email
Media Contact:Katherine Unger Baillie | kbaillie@upenn.edu | 215-898-9194April 10, 2015

Penn Dental Medicine Launches First Open Online Course

blurb: 
The School of Dental Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania's free online course, “Introduction to Dental Medicine,” will allow anyone with access to the Internet to learn what dentistry is all about.

By Sarah Welsh

Study Finds Risk of Breast, Ovarian Cancer Dependent on Type of BRCA1 or BRCA2 Mutation

April 7, 2015

Timothy Rebbeck of the Perelman School of Medicine is quoted about varying BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations and how this affect

Article Source: Fox News
facebook twitter google print email
Media Contact:Katie Delach | katie.delach@uphs.upenn.edu | 215-349-5964April 7, 2015

Penn Study Shows Risk of Breast and Ovarian Cancer May Differ By Type of BRCA1, BRCA2 Mutation

In a study involving more than 31,000 women with cancer-causing mutations in the BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes, researchers at the Basser Center for BRCAthe Abramson Cancer Center, and the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, identified mutations that are associated with significantly different risks of breast and ovarian cancers.