Health & Medicine

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Media Contact:Anna Duerr | anna.duerr@uphs.upenn.edu | 215-349-8369February 11, 2015

Smartphone Apps Just as Accurate as Wearable Devices for Tracking Physical Activity, According to Penn Researchers

Although wearable devices have received significant attention for their ability to track an individual’s physical activity, most smartphone applications are just as accurate, according to a new research letter in JAMA

Jefferson Scientist’s Study of SAD Took Him to Space and Back

February 2, 2015

Michael Thase of the Perelman School of Medicine shares his concerns about evening light therapy and seasonal affective disorder.

Article Source: Philly.com

Smartphone Apps Keep Pace With Costly Fitness Trackers

February 10, 2015

Mitesh Patel of the Perelman School of Medicine comments on researching the accuracy of smartphone fitness applications and wearable fitness trackers

Article Source: Los Angeles Times
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Media Contact:Steve Graff | stephen.graff@uphs.upenn.edu | 215-349-5653February 9, 2015

Immune Biomarkers Help Predict Early Death, Complications in HIV Patients with TB, Penn Study Finds

Doctors treating patients battling both HIV and tuberculosis (TB)—many of whom live in Africa—are faced with the decision when to start those patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART) while they are being treated with antibiotics for active TB disease. 

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Media Contact:Katherine Unger Baillie | kbaillie@upenn.edu | 215-898-9194February 6, 2015

Mosquitoes Ramp Up Immune Defenses After Sucking Blood, Penn Vet Researcher Finds

blurb: 
According to a new study by University of Pennsylvania and Imperial College London researchers, mosquitoes ramp up their immune defenses after consuming blood meals, helping to fight off parasites that blood might contain.

If you were about to enter a crowded subway during flu season, packed with people sneezing and coughing, wouldn’t it be helpful if your immune system recognized the potentially risky situation and bolstered its defenses upon stepping into the train?

Ebola Drug Aids Some in a Study in West Africa

February 4, 2015

Susan Ellenberg of the Perelman School of Medicine is quoted about decisions to offer the drug favipiravir as an Ebola

Article Source: New York Times
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Media Contact:Steve Graff | stephen.graff@uphs.upenn.edu | 215-349-5653February 3, 2015

Sharp, Sustained Increases in Suicides Closely Shadowed Austerity Events in Greece, Penn Study Finds

Sharp and significant increases in suicides followed select financial crisis events and austerity announcements in Greece, from the start of the country’s 2008 recession to steep spending cuts in 2012, Penn Medicine researchers report in a new study published online this week in the British  Medical Journal Open, along with colleagues from Greece and the United Kingdom.

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Media Contact:Steve Graff | stephen.graff@uphs.upenn.edu | 215-349-5653February 3, 2015

Penn Medicine's New Immunotherapy Study Will Pit PD-1 Inhibitor Against Advanced Lung Cancer

Penn Medicine researchers have begun a new immunotherapy trial with the “checkpoint inhibitor” known as pembrolizumab in patients with oligometastatic lung cancer—a state characterized by a few metastases in a confined area—who have completed conventional treatments and are considered free of active disease but remain at a high risk for recurrence.

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Media Contact:Lee-Ann Donegan | leeann.donegan@uphs.upenn.edu | 215-349-5660January 30, 2015

Penn Researchers Show Value of Tissue-Engineering to Repair Major Peripheral Nerve Injuries

Peripheral nerve injury (PNI) is a common consequence of traumatic injuries, wounds caused by an external force or an act of violence, such as a car accident, gun shot or even surgery. In those injuries that require surgical reconstruction, outcomes  can result in partial or complete loss of nerve function and a reduced quality of life. But, researchers at Penn Medicine have demonstrated a novel way to regenerate long-distance nerve connections in animal models using tissue-engineered nerve grafts (TENGs).

Video: Health: Wrestling With Danger?

January 28, 2015

Douglas Smith of the Perelman School of Medicine says, “Traumatic brain injury is one of the strongest environmental ri

Article Source: CBS 3 (Philadelphia)