Health & Medicine

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Media Contact:Jordan Reese | jreese@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604April 19, 2010
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Media Contact: | | April 9, 2010

Penn Dental School Alumnus/World War II Commander Gives $17.3 Million In Largest Ever Gift to Penn Dental

PHILADELPHIA – Dr. Louis Schoenleber, Jr. (C’42, D’43), an alumnus of the University of Pennsylvania School of Dental Medicine, World War II Navy Commander and oral surgeon, has left the majority of proceeds from his multi-million-dollar estate to Penn Dental Medicine’s Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery. The bequest, totaling $17.3 million, is the largest gift in the School’s history and one of the largest gifts ever to a U.S. dental school.

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Media Contact:Karen Kreeger | karen.kreeger@uphs.upenn.edu | 215-349-5658March 25, 2010

New Tissue-Hugging Implant Maps Heart Electrical Activity in Unprecedented Detail

PHILADELPHIA – A team of cardiologists, materials scientists, and bioengineers have created and tested a new type of implantable device for measuring the heart’s electrical output that they say is a vast improvement over current devices. The new device represents the first use of flexible silicon technology for a medical application.

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Media Contact:Jordan Reese | jreese@pobox.upenn.edu | 215-573-6604March 23, 2010

Virtual Driving Leads Penn Psychologists to the Cells That Sense Direction in the Brain: Path Cells

 

PHILADELPHIA – Psychologists led by the University of Pennsylvania have used implantable electrodes and a first-person driving game to identify the cells of the brain that indicate travel in a clockwise or counterclockwise motion, called “path cells.” The study will be published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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Media Contact:Jordan Reese | jreese@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604March 11, 2010

Double Agents: Penn Researchers Identify Immune Cells That Fight Parasites May Promote Allergies and Asthma

PHILADELPHIA –- Millions of people in both the developing and developed world may benefit from new immune-system research findings from the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine.

The Penn Vet researchers, studying how the immune system operates, have discovered a previously unidentified cell population that may be the body’s double-edged sword, fighting off parasitic infections but also causing the harmful immune responses that can lead to allergies and asthma.

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Media Contact:Jordan Reese | jreese@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604March 10, 2010
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Media Contact:Joy McIntyre | joymc@nursing.upenn.edu | 215-898-5074
Media Contact:Jill DiSanto-Haines | jdisanto@upenn.edu | 215-898-4820February 24, 2010

Penn Nursing Hosts "Cities and Women’s Health: Global Perspectives" to Tackle Modern Urban Health Issues

 

PHILADELPHIA — The University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, with the International Congress of Women’s Health Issues, will host ”Cities and Women’s Health: Global Perspectives,” Wednesday, April 7, through Saturday, April 10, on Penn’s campus.

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Media Contact:Jordan Reese | jreese@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604February 3, 2010

Penn Biologists Determine MicroRNA Activity Is Suppressed in Mouse Ovum


PHILADELPHIA –- Biologists at the University of Pennsylvania studying oocytes in mice, the immature egg cells necessary for sexual reproduction, have demonstrated an unusual behavior in microRNA, or miRNA, activity that may be the first event in reprogramming the differentiated oocyte into pluripotent blastomeres of the embryo. MicroRNAs are a member of the family of small RNAs, the so-called dark matter of the biological world.

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Media Contact:Jordan Reese | jreese@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604January 5, 2010

Penn Study Shows Antidepressants Work Best for Severe Depression, Provide Little to No Benefit Otherwise

PHILADELPHIA –- A study of 30 years of antidepressant-drug treatment data published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association shows that the benefit of antidepressant medication compared with placebo may be minimal or nonexistent in patients with mild or moderate symptoms. University of Pennsylvania researchers say, however, the benefit of medications is substantial for patients with very severe depression.

Concussion Warnings Come Too Late for NJ Athlete

December 29, 2009
Douglas Smith of the School of Medicine says concussions suffered by athletes should not be taken lightly.
Article Source: Associated Press