Health & Medicine

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Media Contact:Jordan Reese | jreese@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604December 24, 2008

Embryonic Heart Cells Thrive Only in an Environment That's Just Right, Penn Study Says


PHILADELPHIA –- Cellular engineers at the University of Pennsylvania have determined that cardiomyocytes, the specialized cells that form the heart muscle, thrive when cultured in an environment that mimics their own elastic nature but falter, weaken or die when “grown” on stiffer or softer materials.

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Media Contact:Jordan Reese | jreese@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604December 17, 2008

Penn Veterinary Researcher Tracy Bale Receives Career Development Award from Society for Neuroscience


PHILADELPHIA –- Tracy Bale of the University of Pennsylvania has received a 2008 Career Development Award from the Society for Neuroscience.

Bale is an assistant professor in the departments of Animal Biology at the School of Veterinary Medicine and Psychiatry at the School of Medicine.

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Media Contact:Jordan Reese | jreese@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604November 18, 2008
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Media Contact:Jordan Reese | jreese@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604October 27, 2008

Pennsylvania Muscle Institute Symposium Presents "Structure and Signaling in Normal and Diseased Muscle"


WHO:

The Pennsylvania Muscle Institute is an interdisciplinary group of research investigators in biophysics, biochemistry, genetics and physiology working to discover the mechanisms of muscle function, muscle disease and motile biological systems and to apply these discoveries to new therapies and develop technologies for the study of muscle and motile systems.

WHAT:

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Media Contact:Joy McIntyre | joymc@nursing.upenn.edu | 215-898-5074
Media Contact:Jill DiSanto-Haines | jdisanto@upenn.edu | 215-898-4820October 21, 2008

Penn Nursing Study Finds Skin Color Plays Significant Role in Failure to Detect Rape Injuries

PHILADELPHIA — Researchers the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing found that victims of sexual assault with dark skin are less likely than those with light skin to have their injuries identified, documented and treated, leaving them disadvantaged in the health-care and criminal-justice systems, according to a new study published in the November issue of The American Journal of Emergency Medicine.

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Media Contact:Jordan Reese | jreese@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604September 26, 2008
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