Health & Medicine

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Video: Health: Wrestling With Danger?

January 28, 2015

Douglas Smith of the Perelman School of Medicine says, “Traumatic brain injury is one of the strongest environmental ri

Article Source: CBS 3 (Philadelphia)

Audio: Why Teens Are Impulsive, Addiction-prone and Should Protect Their Brains

January 28, 2015

Frances Jensen of the Perelman School of Medicine discusses brain development and why teens have difficulty controlling

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Media Contact:Katie Delach | katie.delach@uphs.upenn.edu | 215-349-5964January 28, 2015

Penn Medicine Study Shows Menopause Does Not Increase or Create Difficulty Sleeping

Women in their late thirties and forties who have trouble sleeping are more than three times more likely to suffer sleep problems during menopause than women who have an easier time getting shut-eye, according to a new study by researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.

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Media Contact:Karen Kreeger | karen.kreeger@uphs.upenn.edu | 215-349-5658January 26, 2015

Penn Study Reveals Possible Therapeutic Target for Common, But Mysterious Brain Blood Vessel Disorder

Tens of millions of people around the world have abnormal, leak-prone sproutings of blood vessels in the brain called cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs). These abnormal growths can lead to seizures, strokes, hemorrhages, and other serious conditions, yet their precise molecular cause has never been determined. Now, cardiovascular scientists at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania have studied this pathway in heart development to discover an important set of molecular signals, triggered by CCM-linked gene defects, that potentially could be targeted to treat the disorder.

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Media Contact:Evan Lerner | elerner@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604January 28, 2015

Penn-led Study: Children With Respiratory Failure Can Be Awake Yet Comfortable in ICU

blurb: 
Standard practice in hospitals is to fully sedate children on ventilators for their comfort and safety, but a new study shows that lighter, more finely-tuned sedation can be just as effective.

For small children, being hospitalized is an especially frightening experience above and beyond the challenges of whatever they are being treated for. They are often connected to a variety of unpleasant tubes and monitors, which they may instinctively try to remove.    

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Media Contact:Katherine Unger Baillie | kbaillie@upenn.edu | 215-898-9194January 26, 2015
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Media Contact:Katherine Unger Baillie | kbaillie@upenn.edu | 215-898-9194January 26, 2015

Penn Dental Medicine Team Shows Why Wound Healing Is Impaired in Diabetics

blurb: 
Scientists at the University of Pennsylvania School of Dental Medicine have identified a critical molecule that helps explain why diabetics suffer from slow wound healing and pinpoints a target for therapies that could help boost healing.

One of the most troubling complications of diabetes is its effect on wound healing. Roughly 15 percent of diabetics will suffer from a non-healing wound in their lifetime. In some cases, these open ulcers on the skin lead to amputations.

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Media Contact:Anna Duerr | anna.duerr@uphs.upenn.edu | 215-349-8369January 20, 2015

Penn Medicine Bioethicists Call for Return to Asylums for Long-Term Psychiatric Care

As the United States population has doubled since 1955, the number of inpatient psychiatric beds in the United States has been cut by nearly 95 percent to just 45,000, a wholly inadequate equation when considering that there are currently 10 million U.S. residents with serious mental illness.

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Media Contact:Lee-Ann Donegan | leeann.donegan@uphs.upenn.edu | 215-349-5660January 20, 2015

Penn Medicine Researchers Discover Possible New General Anesthetics

Penn Medicine researchers, in a continuation of their groundbreaking work to better understand how anesthesia works in the body, have found the first new class of novel anesthetics since the 1970s. Their findings, published in February issue of Anesthesiology, detail the processes through which the group uncovered these compounds.

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Media Contact:Anna Duerr | anna.duerr@uphs.upenn.edu | 215-349-8369January 21, 2015

Medicaid "Fee Bump" to Primary Care Doctors Associated with Better Access to Appointments, According to Penn Study

The increase in Medicaid reimbursement for primary care providers, a key provision of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), was associated with a 7.7 percentage points increase in new patient appointment availability without longer wait times, according to results of a new 10-state study — co-authored by researchers at the University of Pennsylvania and the Urban Institute, and funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation — published online-first by the New England Journal of Medicine.