Health & Medicine

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Media Contact:Karen Kreeger | Karen.kreeger@uphs.upenn.edu | 215-349-5658February 26, 2014

Penn Study Shows Way to Make Treatment of Rare Blood Disorder More Affordable and Effective

A University of Pennsylvania research team has defined a possible new way to fight a disease that is currently treatable only with the most expensive drug available for sale in the United States.

Penn Researchers Study a Drug That Slows Heavy Drinking

February 27, 2014

A study on the anticonvulsant drug topiramate led by Henry Kranzler of the Perelman School of Medicine is highlighted.

Article Source: Philadelphia Inquirer
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Media Contact:Evan Lerner | elerner@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604February 27, 2014

Muscle-controlling Neurons Know When They Mess Up, According to Penn Research

blurb: 
A team of researchers from Penn and Princeton has begun to unravel the decades-spanning paradox concerning how the brain's motor-control feedback system works.

Whether it is playing a piano sonata or acing a tennis serve, the brain needs to orchestrate precise, coordinated control over the body’s many muscles. Moreover, there needs to be some kind of feedback from the senses should any of those movements go wrong.

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Media Contact:Steve Graff | stephen.graff@uphs.upenn.edu | 215-349-5653February 24, 2014

Penn Study: Blocking Autophagy with Malaria Drug May Help Overcome Resistance to BRAF Drugs in Melanoma

Half of melanoma patients with the BRAF mutation have a positive response to treatment with BRAF inhibitors, but nearly all of those patients develop resistance to the drugs and experience disease progression.

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Media Contact:Karen Kreeger | Karen.kreeger@uphs.upenn.edu | 215-349-5658February 21, 2014

Penn Medicine: Origin of Human Malaria Parasite Linked to Primates in Africa

An international team of scientists has traced the origin of Plasmodium vivax, the second-worst malaria parasite of humans, to Africa, according to a study published this week in Nature Communications.

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Media Contact:Evan Lerner | elerner@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604February 24, 2014

Penn Researchers Show Nuclear Stiffness Keeps Stem Cells and Cancer Cells in Place

blurb: 
Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania have shown that cell migration through micron-size pores is regulated by lamin-A, a nuclear protein that is very similar to the fibrous ones that make up hair.

Adult stem cells and cancer cells have many things in common, including an ability to migrate through tiny gaps in tissue. Both types of cells also experience a trade-off when it comes to this ability; having a flexible nucleus makes migration easier but is worse at protecting the nucleus’ DNA compared to a stiffer nucleus.

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Media Contact:Kim Menard | Kim.Menard@uphs.upenn.edu | 215-662-6183February 19, 2014

Penn Medicine and Wistar Scientists Create Precise Tumor Classifier for Glioblastoma

A newly developed, more specific approach to classifying tumors by molecular type can help cancer researchers to determine tumor characteristics and guide treatment strategies.

Study: Mental Health Patients Up to 4 Times More Likely to Contract HIV

February 20, 2014

Michael Blank and Dwight Evans of the Perelman School of Medicine discuss researching mental health patients’ likelihood of contracting HIV.

Article Source: CBS Atlanta

Insured Less Likely Than Uninsured to Be Taken to Trauma Center

February 20, 2014

M. Kit Delgado of the Perelman School of Medicine is featured for authoring a new study on patients that go to trauma centers.

Article Source: Philadelphia Inquirer

A Powerful and Undetectable New Kind of Doping May Be Happening at the Olympics

February 19, 2014

H. Lee Sweeney of the Perelman School of Medicine says, “The world may be about to watch one of its last Olympic Games without genetically enhanced athletes.”

Article Source: Business Insider