Natural Science

7
facebook twitter google print email
Media Contact:Evan Lerner | elerner@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604January 8, 2014

The ‘Personalized Advantage Index,’ a Decision-Making Tool, Developed at Penn

blurb: 
One of the primary social motivations for scientific research is the ability to make better decisions based on the results. Now, researchers at the University of Pennsylvania and the University of Pittsburgh have developed a decision-making model that compares and weights multiple variables.

One of the primary social motivations for scientific research is the ability to make better decisions based on the results.

Flower-like Liquid Crystal Lens Grows Like a Pearl

January 6, 2014

Randall Kamien of the School of Arts and Sciences is quoted about researching liquid crystal lenses.

Article Source: New Scientist

Audio: Alien Earthworms and Urban Squirrels

December 18, 2013

Etienne Benson of the School of Arts and Sciences discusses the urbanization of the gray squirrel.

facebook twitter google print email
Media Contact:Evan Lerner | elerner@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604December 18, 2013

Penn Researchers Grow Liquid Crystal 'Flowers' That Can Be Used as Lenses

blurb: 
A team of material scientists, chemical engineers and physicists from the University of Pennsylvania has made another advance in their effort to use liquid crystals as a medium for assembling structures.

A team of material scientists, chemical engineers and physicists from the University of Pennsylvania has made another advance in their effort to use liquid crystals as a medium for assembling structures.

facebook twitter google print email
Media Contact:Evan Lerner | elerner@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604December 10, 2013

Researchers at Penn Help Develop a Dynamic Model of Tissue Failure

blurb: 
Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania, Brown University and ETH Zurich have now used a series of experiments to develop a dynamic model of the stresses that stretch growing tissue. This model is the first to take into account the complicated feedback effects of cells’ molecular motors, which can respond to external stress by pulling harder on their environment, eventually tearing the tissue apart.

The idea of growing replacement tissue to repair an organ, or to swap it out for an entirely new one, is rapidly transitioning from science fiction to fact.

facebook twitter google print email
Media Contact:Evan Lerner | elerner@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604December 6, 2013

Researchers at Penn Show Optimal Framework for Heartbeats

blurb: 
There is an optimal amount of strain that a beating heart can generate and still beat at its usual rate, once per second. Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania have now shown that this “sweet spot” depends on the stiffness of the collagen framework that the heart’s cells live within.

The heart maintains a careful balancing act; too soft and it won’t pump blood, but too hard and it will overtax itself and stop entirely. There is an optimal amount of strain that a beating heart can generate and still beat at its usual rate, once per second.

facebook twitter google print email
Media Contact:Evan Lerner | elerner@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604
Media Contact:Liz Vaughan-Adams | liz.vadams@ipgroupplc.com | +44 (0) 20 7444 0062December 5, 2013

Penn’s Center for Tech Transfer Partners With British-based IP Group

The University of Pennsylvania, through its Center for Technology Transfer and its UPstart company formation program, has announced a new partnership with IP Group PLC, developer of intellectual property-based businesses. 

Our Memories Are Geo-Tagged

December 2, 2013

Research about geo-tagging memories from Michael Kahana of the School of Arts and Sciences is cited.

Article Source: Atlantic Cities

Want an Unconquerable Mind? Try Stoic Philosophy

December 1, 2013

Martin Seligman of the School of Arts and Sciences is quoted for explaining his concept of “learned helplessness.”

Article Source: Forbes.com

Audio: Brain Cells ‘Geotag’ Memories to Cache What Happened – and Where

November 28, 2013

Michael Kahana of the School of Arts and Sciences discusses his research on the interplay between memories of events and places.

Article Source: National Public Radio