Natural Science

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Media Contact:Evan Lerner | elerner@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604May 6, 2014

Penn Research Combines Graphene and Painkiller Receptor

blurb: 
Researchers from the University of Pennsylvania have led an effort to create an artificial chemical sensor based on one of the human body’s most important receptors, allowing its response to be read out by a computer.

Almost every biological process involves sensing the presence of a certain chemical. Finely tuned over millions of years of evolution, the body’s different receptors are shaped to accept certain target chemicals.

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Media Contact:Katherine Unger Baillie | kbaillie@upenn.edu | 215-898-9194May 5, 2014

Immune Cells Outsmart Bacterial Infection by Dying, Penn Vet Study Shows

blurb: 
A new study led by scientists at the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine has painted a clearer picture of the delicate arms race between the human immune system and a pathogen that seeks to infect and kill human cells.

A new study led by scientists at the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine has painted a clearer picture of the delicate arms race between the human immune system and a pathogen that seeks to infect and kill human cells. 

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Media Contact:Evan Lerner | elerner@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604May 1, 2014

Penn and CHOP Researchers Track Working Memory From Childhood Through Adolescence

blurb: 
A new longitudinal study has found that differences in working memory that exist at age 10 persist through the end of adolescence.

Working memory, the ability to hold information in your mind, think about it and use it to guide behavior, develops through childhood and adolescence and is key for successful performance at school and work. Previous research with young children has documented socioeconomic disparities in performance on tasks of working memory.

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Media Contact:Katherine Unger Baillie | kbaillie@upenn.edu | 215-898-9194May 1, 2014

Penn Vet Research Identifies Compounds That Control Hemorrhagic Viruses

blurb: 
Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine teamed with colleagues to identify and develop compounds that could reduce the ability of viruses that cause diseases such as Ebola, rabies, HIV and Lassa fever to spread infection.

People fear diseases such as Ebola, Marburg, Lassa fever, rabies and HIV for good reason; they have high mortality rates and few, if any, possible treatments. As many as 90 percent of people who contract Ebola, for instance, die of the disease.

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Media Contact:Evan Lerner | elerner@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604
Media Contact:Katherine Unger Baillie | kbaillie@upenn.edu | 215-898-9194 April 30, 2014

Two Penn Professors Elected to National Academy of Sciences

blurb: 
Charles Kane and Scott Poethig of the University of Pennsylvania have been elected members of the National Academy of Sciences, considered one of the highest honors that can be accorded a United States scientist or engineer.

Charles Kane and Scott Poethig of the University of Pennsylvania have been elected members of the National Academy of Sciences, considered one of the highest honors that can be acc

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Media Contact:Evan Lerner | elerner@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604April 16, 2014

Cosmologists at Penn Weigh Cosmic Filaments and Voids

blurb: 
Dark matter is thought to exist in a vast network of filaments throughout the universe, pulling luminous galaxies into an interconnected web of clusters, interspersed with seemingly empty voids. Penn researchers have measured the "weight" of these voids and filaments for the first time, showing the former are not as empty as they look.

Cosmologists have established that much of the stuff of the universe is made of dark matter, a mysterious, invisible substance that can’t be directly detected but which exerts a gravitational pull on surrounding objects.

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Media Contact:Evan Lerner | elerner@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604April 4, 2014

Penn Students Vie for Grand Prize in PennVention Competition

blurb: 
The Weiss Tech House holds an annual invention competition known as PennVention. The final round will see the distribution of more than $20,000 in prizes.

WHO:              Alan Greenberger
                         Deputy Mayor for Economic Development and Director of Commerce

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Media Contact:Evan Lerner | elerner@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604
Media Contact:Jessica Mikulski | jessica.mikulski@uphs.upenn.edu | 215-349-8369March 31, 2014

New Penn-Designed Gel Allows for Targeted Therapy After Heart Attack

blurb: 
Each patient responds to heart attacks differently and damage can vary from one part of the heart muscle to another. Penn researchers have developed a way to address this variation via a material that can be applied directly to damaged heart tissue.

Combatting the tissue degrading enzymes that cause lasting damage following a heart attack is tricky. Each patient responds to a heart attack differently and damage can vary from one part of the heart muscle to another, but existing treatments can’t be fine-tuned to deal with this variation. 

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Media Contact:Monica Yant Kinney | mokinney@vpul.upenn.edu | 215-898-8016
Media Contact:Jeanne Leong | jleong@upenn.edu | 215-573-8151March 25, 2014

Disabilities Symposium at Penn: April 11


 
WHAT:          The 13th Annual Disabilities Symposium, hosted by the Weingarten Learning Resources Center, University of Pennsylvania, will welcome guest speakers Angela Duckworth and Adam Taliaferro.
 

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Media Contact:Kim Menard | Kim.Menard@uphs.upenn.edu | 215-662-6183
Media Contact:Evan Lerner | elerner@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604March 20, 2014

Penn-designed Device Shows Promise for Individualized Care in Stroke Patients

blurb: 
Using a Penn-designed device to noninvasively and continuously monitor cerebral blood flow in acute stroke patients, researchers are now learning how head of bed (HOB) positioning affects blood flow reaching the brain.

Using a University of Pennsylvania-designed device to noninvasively and continuously monitor cerebral blood flow (CBF) in acute stroke patients, researchers from Penn Medicine and the Department of Physics & Astronomy in Penn Arts and Sciences are now learning how head of