Natural Science

7

Audio/Video: Rock ‘Em Sock ‘Em…Cockroach Style?

May 7, 2015

Undergraduates Steve RybickiAriana SchanzerStephanie Mark

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Media Contact:Evan Lerner | elerner@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604May 7, 2015

Penn Research Points to Omega-3 as a Nutritional Intervention for Childhood Behavioral Problems

At the forefront of a field known as “neurocriminology,” Adrian Raine of the University of Pennsylvania has long studied the interplay between biology and environment when it comes to antisocial and criminal behavior.

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Media Contact:Evan Lerner | elerner@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604May 7, 2015

Penn Researchers Develop Custom Artificial Membranes to Study the Molecular Basis of Disease

blurb: 
Decorating the outside of cells like tiny antenna, a diverse community of sugar molecules acts like a telecommunications system, sending and receiving information, recognizing and responding to foreign molecules and neighboring cells.

By Madeleine Stone  @themadstone       

Decorating the outside of cells like tiny antenna, a diverse community of sugar molecules acts like a telecommunications system, sending and receiving information, recognizing and responding to foreign molecules and neighboring cells.

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Media Contact:Katherine Unger Baillie | kbaillie@upenn.edu | 215-898-9194May 6, 2015

Penn-Michigan State Team Develops Novel Gene Therapy for Achromatopsia

blurb: 
Researchers from the University of Pennsylvania and Michigan State University tested a gene therapy in dogs with achromatopsia and found that the treatment demonstrated a functional rescue of cone cells in nearly 100 percent of treated eyes.

Researchers from the University of Pennsylvania and Michigan State University presented new preclinical data this week that evaluates the efficacy of a gene therapy treatment for achromatopsia, a rare inherited retinal disease that involves cone cells. The disease affects humans as well as dogs.

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Media Contact:Evan Lerner | elerner@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604May 5, 2015

Penn and UC Merced Researchers Match Physical and Virtual Atomic Friction Experiments

Technological limitations have made studying friction on the atomic scale difficult, but researchers at the University of Pennsylvania and the University of California, Merced, have now made advances in that quest on two fronts.

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Media Contact:Katherine Unger Baillie | kbaillie@upenn.edu | 215-898-9194
Media Contact:Evan Lerner | elerner@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604May 4, 2015

National Academy of Sciences Elects Penn Professor and Incoming Professor

Dorothy Cheney, a biologist at the University of Pennsylvania, and Abraham Nitzan, a chemist who will join Penn’s faculty in July, have been elected members of the National Academy of Scien

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Media Contact:Evan Lerner | elerner@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604April 30, 2015

Penn Senior Matthew Lisle: Adapting to Climate Change Through Water Security

blurb: 
One of the biggest challenges of the 21st century will be meeting the world’s growing water needs in the face of a changing climate. Like other environmental challenges, achieving water security will require innovation on many fronts.

By Madeleine Stone  @themadstone       

(This is the fifth and last in a series of features introducing the inaugural Penn President’s Engagement Prize winners.)  

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Media Contact:Katherine Unger Baillie | kbaillie@upenn.edu | 215-898-9194 April 23, 2015

Penn Study Identifies Molecular Link Between DNA Damage and Premature Aging

blurb: 
University of Pennsylvania researchers found that inactivating interferon signaling in a mouse model of progeria, or premature aging, extended the animals’ lives.

Like a beloved pair of jeans, human DNA accumulates damage over time, and older people’s bodies can’t repair it as well. Many scientists believe a build up of damage can cause cells to enter an irreversible dormant state known as senescence.

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Media Contact:Katherine Unger Baillie | kbaillie@upenn.edu | 215-898-9194April 22, 2015

Penn Vet, Montreal and McGill Researchers Show How Blood-Brain Barrier Is Maintained

blurb: 
In a new study, researchers have made insights into how the blood-brain barrier, or BBB, is maintained, identifying a protein key to the process. Delivering this protein to mice with the rodent equivalent of MS improved their symptoms.

The brain is a privileged organ in the body. So vital to life, the brain is protected from alterations elsewhere in the body by a highly regulated gateway known as the blood-brain barrier, which allows only selected molecules to pass through.

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Media Contact:Evan Lerner | elerner@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604April 15, 2015

Mentally Stepping Back From Problems Helps Youth Deal With Negative Emotions, Penn Study Says

Adolescence is a time of frequent and intense emotional experiences, but some youth handle their emotions better than others. Why do some young people react adaptively while others ruminate?