Natural Science

7
facebook twitter google print email
Media Contact:Julie S. McWilliams | juliemcw@upenn.edu | 215-898-1422January 11, 2012

Eight Professors Named 2012 Penn Fellows

PHILADELPHIA – Eight University of Pennsylvania professors have been named Penn Fellows for 2012. 

facebook twitter google print email
Media Contact:Evan Lerner | elerner@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604
Media Contact:Karen Kreeger | karen.kreeger@uphs.upenn.edu | 215-349-5658 January 5, 2012

Four Penn Professors Named AAAS Fellows

PHILADELPHIA - Four faculty members at the University of Pennsylvania have been named Fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.  Three from Penn’s Perelman School of Medicine and one from its School of Arts and Sciences.

Planet of the Apes: How Do We Know Evolution Really Happens? Through Viruses

January 2, 2012

Harvey Rubin of the Perelman School of Medicine and Joshua Plotkin of the School of Arts and Sciences and the School of Engineering and Applied Science discussevolution through viruses.

Article Source: Philadelphia Inquirer
facebook twitter google print email
Media Contact:Evan Lerner | elerner@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604December 21, 2011

Penn Scientists Pioneer New Method for Watching Proteins Fold

PHILADELPHIA — A protein’s function depends on both the chains of molecules it is made of and the way those chains are folded. And while figuring out the former is relatively easy, the latter represents a huge challenge with serious implications because many diseases are the result of misfolded proteins. Now, a team of chemists at the University of Pennsylvania has devised a way to watch proteins fold in “real-time,” which could lead to a better understanding of protein folding and misfolding in general.

facebook twitter google print email
Media Contact:Katie Delach | Katie.Delach@uphs.upenn.edu | 215-349-5964December 20, 2011

Penn Medical Researchers Dispute the Efficacy of a Breast Cancer Treatment

PHILADELPHIA -- Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania’s Perelman School of Medicine are suggesting that a prophylactic treatment option increasingly offered to breast cancer patients has only a slight benefit, and the modest gains to life expectancy the treatment provides may actually be offset by decreases in quality of life for many patients.

Penn Helps Find Hints of Elusive Higgs Particle

December 13, 2011

Brig Williams, Joseph Kroll and Elliot Lipeles of the School of Arts and Sciences are featured for finding hints of the Higgs particle.

Article Source: Philadelphia Inquirer
facebook twitter google print email
Media Contact:Evan Lerner | elerner@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604December 6, 2011

Five Penn Researchers Named American Physical Society Fellows

PHILADELPHIA — The American Physical Society has elected five University of Pennsylvania faculty members to its 2011 APS Fellowship class. They are Mark Devlin, Alan “Charlie” Johnson, Joshua Klein, Feng Gai and Howard Hu.

Devlin, Johnson and Klein are members of the School of Arts and Science’s Department of Physics and Astronomy.

facebook twitter google print email
Media Contact:Evan Lerner | elerner@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604December 5, 2011

Penn Geneticists Help Show Bitter Taste Perception Is Not Just About Flavors

PHILADELPHIA — Long the bane of picky eaters everywhere, broccoli’s taste is not just a matter of having a cultured palate; some people can easily taste a bitter compound in the vegetable that others have difficulty detecting. Now a team of Penn researchers has helped uncover the evolutionary history of one of the genes responsible for this trait. Beyond showing the ancient origins of the gene, the researchers discovered something unexpected: something other than taste must have driven its evolution.

Physicists Put Earthquakes Under the Microscope

November 30, 2011

Robert Carpick of the School of Engineering and Applied Science comments on his research demonstrating earthquake friction effect at the nanoscale.

Article Source: Physicsworld.com
facebook twitter google print email
Media Contact:Evan Lerner | elerner@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604November 30, 2011

Penn and Brown Researchers Demonstrate Earthquake Friction Effect at the Nanoscale

PHILADELPHIA — Earthquakes are some of the most daunting natural disasters that scientists try to analyze. Though the earth’s major fault lines are well known, there is little scientists can do to predict when an earthquake will occur or how strong it will be. And, though earthquakes involve millions of tons of rock, a team of University of Pennsylvania and Brown University researchers has helped discover an aspect of friction on the nanoscale that may lead to a better understanding of the disasters.