Natural Science

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Media Contact:Jordan Reese | jreese@pobox.upenn.edu | 215-573-6604March 10, 2008

Policing Cells Demand ID to Tell Friend From Foe, Say University of Pennsylvania Cell Engineers

PHILADELPHIA – University of Pennsylvania scientists studying macrophages, the biological cells that spring from white blood cells to eat and destroy foreign or dying cells, have discovered how these “policemen” differentiate between friend and foe.
The paper appears as the cover article in the March 10 edition of the Journal of Cell Biology.

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Media Contact:Jordan Reese | jreese@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604March 3, 2008
facebook twitter google print email
Media Contact:Jordan Reese | jreese@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604March 3, 2008
facebook twitter google print email
Media Contact:Jordan Reese | jreese@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604March 3, 2008

Viruses Evolve To Play By Host Rules, According to University of Pennsylvania Researchers

PHILADELPHIA -- Biologists at the University of Pennsylvania and Harvard University have examined the complete genomes of viruses that infect the bacteria E. coli, P. aeruginosa and L. lactis and have found that many of these viral genomes exhibit codon bias, the tendency to preferentially encode a protein with a particular spelling.

Researchers analyzed patterns of codon usage across 74 bacteriophages using the concept of a "genome landscape," a method of visualizing long-range patterns in a genome sequence.

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Media Contact:Jordan Reese | jreese@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604February 28, 2008

Heightened Weighing Discomfort Among Women May Increase Their Health Risks, Penn Study Indicates

PHILADELPHIA -– A new study from the University of Pennsylvania points to increased health risks for women owing to their higher level of discomfort about being weighed in public.
The study showed that college-age females, more than their male counterparts, experience high degrees of discomfort at the prospect of being weighed in the presence of others.

The study’s authors believe that some women may avoid necessary tests and treatments when a doctor visit includes a step on a public scale.

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Media Contact:Andrew Zitcer | awz@pobox.upenn.edu | 215-573-6107
Media Contact:Julie McWilliams | juliemcw@upenn.edu | 215-898-1422February 26, 2008

University of Pennsylvania Selects Weiss/Manfredi, M+W Zander to Design Singh Nanotechnology Center

PHILADELPHIA -- The University of Pennsylvania has selected the architectural design firm Weiss/Manfredi along with M+W Zander, an engineering and construction firm that specializes in projects with a scientific focus, to design the Krishna P. Singh Center for Nanotechnology.

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Media Contact: | | January 16, 2008

Sarah Tishkoff Named Penn's Newest PIK Professor

PHILADELPHIA -– Sarah Tishkoff, a leading global expert in human genetics, has been named the sixth Penn Integrates Knowledge University Professor at the University of Pennsylvania.

The announcement was made today by Penn President Amy Gutmann and Provost Ronald Daniels.

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Media Contact:Jordan Reese | jreese@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604January 15, 2008

Penn Engineers Create Carbon Nanopipettes That Are Smaller Than Cells and Measure Electric Current

PHILADELPHIA –- University of Pennsylvania engineers and physicians have developed a carbon nanopipette thousands of times thinner than a human hair that measures electric current and delivers fluids into cells. Researchers developed this tiny carbon-based tool to probe cells with minimal intrusion and inject fluids without damaging or inhibiting cell growth.

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Media Contact:Jordan Reese | jreese@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604December 17, 2007

Agent Orange Chemical, Dioxin, Attacks the Mitochondria To Cause Cancer, Says Penn Research Team

PHILADELPHIA— Researchers with the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine have demonstrated the process by which the cancer-causing chemical dioxin attacks the cellular machinery, disrupts normal cellular function and ultimately promotes tumor progression.

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Media Contact:Jordan Reese | jreese@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604November 29, 2007

University of Pennsylvania Study Reveals Inconspicuous Hosts in the Lyme Disease Epidemic

PHILADELPHIA -– A study led by a University of Pennsylvania biologist in the tick-infested woods of the Hudson Valley is challenging the widely held belief that mice are the main animal reservoir for Lyme disease in the U.S.

The paper, published in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B, demonstrates that chipmunks and two shrew species, not just mice, are the four species that account for major outbreaks.