Natural Science

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Media Contact:Evan Lerner | elerner@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604December 10, 2013

Researchers at Penn Help Develop a Dynamic Model of Tissue Failure

blurb: 
Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania, Brown University and ETH Zurich have now used a series of experiments to develop a dynamic model of the stresses that stretch growing tissue. This model is the first to take into account the complicated feedback effects of cells’ molecular motors, which can respond to external stress by pulling harder on their environment, eventually tearing the tissue apart.

The idea of growing replacement tissue to repair an organ, or to swap it out for an entirely new one, is rapidly transitioning from science fiction to fact.

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Media Contact:Evan Lerner | elerner@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604December 6, 2013

Researchers at Penn Show Optimal Framework for Heartbeats

blurb: 
There is an optimal amount of strain that a beating heart can generate and still beat at its usual rate, once per second. Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania have now shown that this “sweet spot” depends on the stiffness of the collagen framework that the heart’s cells live within.

The heart maintains a careful balancing act; too soft and it won’t pump blood, but too hard and it will overtax itself and stop entirely. There is an optimal amount of strain that a beating heart can generate and still beat at its usual rate, once per second.

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Media Contact:Evan Lerner | elerner@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604
Media Contact:Liz Vaughan-Adams | liz.vadams@ipgroupplc.com | +44 (0) 20 7444 0062December 5, 2013

Penn’s Center for Tech Transfer Partners With British-based IP Group

The University of Pennsylvania, through its Center for Technology Transfer and its UPstart company formation program, has announced a new partnership with IP Group PLC, developer of intellectual property-based businesses. 

Our Memories Are Geo-Tagged

December 2, 2013

Research about geo-tagging memories from Michael Kahana of the School of Arts and Sciences is cited.

Article Source: Atlantic Cities

Want an Unconquerable Mind? Try Stoic Philosophy

December 1, 2013

Martin Seligman of the School of Arts and Sciences is quoted for explaining his concept of “learned helplessness.”

Article Source: Forbes.com

Audio: Brain Cells ‘Geotag’ Memories to Cache What Happened – and Where

November 28, 2013

Michael Kahana of the School of Arts and Sciences discusses his research on the interplay between memories of events and places.

Article Source: National Public Radio
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Media Contact:Evan Lerner | elerner@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604November 28, 2013

Memories Are ‘Geotagged’ With Spatial Information, Penn Researchers Say

Using a video game in which people navigate through a virtual town delivering objects to specific locations, a team of neuroscientists from the University of Pennsylvania and Freiburg University has discovered how brain cells that encode spatial information form “geotags” for specific memories and are activated immediately before those memories are recalled.

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Media Contact:Evan Lerner | elerner@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604November 26, 2013

Penn Science Café: Squid Camouflage

blurb: 
Alison Sweeney has a Ph.D. in biology, yet is a member of Penn’s Department of Physics and Astronomy. What is a physicist doing studying giant clams and exotic squid? Her research is focused on photonic structures found in these creatures that give them unique and surprising abilities.

WHO:            Alison Sweeney
                     Assistant Professor of Physics

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Media Contact:Evan Lerner | elerner@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604November 25, 2013

Researchers at Penn Uncover Mechanism Behind Blood Stem Cells’ Longevity

The blood stem cells that live in bone marrow are at the top of a complex family tree. Such stem cells split and divide down various pathways that ultimately produce red cells, white cells and platelets.

What Does Cancer Smell Like?

November 19, 2013

A.T. Charlie Johnson of the School of Arts and Sciences is mentioned for studying electronic nose sniff blood samples of both sick and healthy patients.

Article Source: New York Times