Technology & Engineering

11
facebook twitter google print email
Media Contact:Katherine Unger Baillie | kbaillie@upenn.edu | 215-898-9194January 14, 2013

After Six Decades, Penn Archaeologists Carry on a Tradition of Research and Discovery in Turkey

In 1950, the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology sent scholars to a site in central Turkey, about 50 miles southwest of Ankara. There they began an effort to uncover — literally and figuratively — details about the societies and cultures of the people who lived there hundreds to thousands of years before.

facebook twitter google print email
Media Contact:Evan Lerner | elerner@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604January 9, 2013

Penn Physicists Help Create ‘Recipe Book’ for Building New Materials

PHILADELPHIA — By showing that tiny particles injected into a liquid crystal medium behave as predicted by existing mathematical theorems, physicists have opened the door for the creation of a host of new materials with properties that do not exist in nature.

The findings show that researchers can create a "recipe book" to build new materials of sorts using topology, a major mathematical field that describes the properties that do not change when an object is stretched, bent or otherwise “continuously deformed.”

facebook twitter google print email
Media Contact:Jacquie Posey | jposey@upenn.edu | 215-898-6460January 8, 2013

Technology Aims to Improve Lung Transplant Odds

January 6, 2013

Edward Cantu and Joel Cooper of the Perelman School of Medicine comment on testing technology designed to help improve lung transplant success.

Article Source: Philly.com
facebook twitter google print email
Media Contact:Katherine Unger Baillie | kbaillie@upenn.edu | 215-898-9194January 7, 2013

Penn Research Shows Mountains Are Only Minor Contributors to Sediment Erosion and Climate Regulation

PHILADELPHIA — Though churning smokestacks, cud-chewing cows and gasoline-burning vehicles are contributing constantly to greenhouse gas emissions, there are also many processes that do the reverse, pulling molecules like carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere. One of these is chemical weathering, which occurs when rock turns into soil. Carbon dioxide molecules and rain combine to dissolve rock, and the weathering products, including sediment, eventually make their way through waterways to the ocean where some become trapped on the ocean bottom and in coral reefs and seashells.

Video: New Medical App for Doctors, Patients’ Families

December 28, 2012

David Kennedy of the Perelman School of Medicine discusses how he uses a new app, called MD Connect Me, to give families updates via text or email throughout the procedure.

Article Source: 6ABC
facebook twitter google print email
Media Contact:Evan Lerner | elerner@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604January 2, 2013

Penn Researchers Show New Level of Control Over Liquid Crystals

PHILADELPHIA — Directed assembly is a growing field of research in nanotechnology in which scientists and engineers aim to manufacture structures on the smallest scales without having to individually manipulate each component. Rather, they set out precisely defined starting conditions and let the physics and chemistry that govern those components do the rest.  

Video: Slapshot Bots

December 17, 2012

Penn’s Robockey 2012 event hosted by Jonathan Fiene of the School of Engineering and Applied Science is featured.

Article Source: Philly.com
facebook twitter google print email
Media Contact:Evan Lerner | elerner@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604December 14, 2012

Penn Metamaterials Experts Show a Way to Reduce Electrons’ Effective Mass to Nearly Zero

PHILADELPHIA — The field of metamaterials involves augmenting materials with specially designed patterns, enabling those materials to manipulate electromagnetic waves and fields in previously impossible ways. Now, researchers from the University of Pennsylvania have come up with a theory for moving this phenomenon onto the quantum scale, laying out blueprints for materials where electrons have nearly zero effective mass.

Such materials could make for faster circuits with novel properties.

facebook twitter google print email
Media Contact:Evan Lerner | elerner@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604December 13, 2012

Penn’s Steven Fluharty Makes Case for Research Funding in Capitol Hill Briefing

PHILADELPHIA — In the waning days of 2012, two words have dominated the post-election discourse: “fiscal cliff.” The cliff is a combination of impending budgetary measures that will take effect in January if a legislative compromise is not reached.

One area of the budget that would see serious cuts is funding for the national science agencies, such as the National Institutes of Health and National Science Foundation. Combined with cuts to other agencies and departments, the amount of research and development funding lost could total $58 billion over five years.