Technology & Engineering

11

Software Predicts Criminal Behavior

August 22, 2010

Richard Berk of the School of Arts and Sciences discusses his development of software that can determine future criminal behavior.

Article Source: ABC News

Can Greasy Fingerprints on Smart Phones Give Away Passcodes?

August 17, 2010

Researchers at of the School of Engineering and Applied Science are cited for research on smartphone password cracks.

Article Source: Discover

Wireless Phones Cause Cancer or Other Maladies. Or Not

August 13, 2010

Kenneth Foster of the School of Engineering and Applied Science discusses cell-phone health risks.

Article Source: Philadelphia Daily News

Android Passcodes Deciphered by Smudges

August 12, 2010

Researchers at the School of Engineering and Applied Science use photography to reveal breaches in smartphone password protection.

Article Source: New York Times

Smartphone Security Thwarted by Fingerprint Smudges

August 11, 2010

Researchers at of the School of Engineering and Applied Science are cited for research on password breaches on smartphones.

Article Source: PCWorld

Penn Students Create Ambitious Plan for Rail Service

August 11, 2010

Robert Yaro, Marilyn Jordan Taylor and students of the School of Design devise a high-speed-railway proposal for the Northeast Corridor.

Article Source: Philadelphia Inquirer

Cost the Highest Hurdle for High-Speed Rail in U.S.

August 9, 2010

Robert Yaro of the School of Design discusses high-speed rail systems.

Article Source: The Philadelphia Inquirer

Citizen Science: People Power

August 4, 2010

Michael Kearns of the School of Engineering and Applied Science says, “We're at the dawn of a new era, in which computation between humans and machines is being mixed.”

Article Source: Nature
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Media Contact:Jordan Reese | jreese@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604August 1, 2010

Mechanical Regulation Effects Stem Cell Development, Adhesion

PHILADELPHIA –- Bioengineers at the University of Pennsylvania have created a system to control the flexibility of the substrate surfaces on which cells are grown without changing the surface properties, providing a technique for more controlled lab experiments on cellular mechanobiology, an important step in the scientific effort to understand how cells sense and respond to mechanical forces in their environment.

Computer With Patient Data Stolen From Jefferson

July 30, 2010

Ross Koppel of the School of Medicine comments on digital medical data.

Article Source: Philadelphia Inquirer