The Cowpens-Guilford Courthouse Campaign
Search the full text of this book:

Powered by Google

The Cowpens-Guilford Courthouse Campaign

Burke Davis

224 pages | 5 1/4 x 8
Paper 2002 | ISBN 978-0-8122-1832-9 | $21.95s | £14.50 | Add to cart
Not for sale outside North America and the UK

"A remarkable chronicle. Davis's characterizations of the various commanders are sharp; his descriptions of the terrain concise. The graphic explanations of arms and logistics will delight the technically minded."—John Toland, New York Times

On January 17, 1781, near Cowpens, a drover's camp on the old Cherokee trading trail in Carolina territory, Continental troops and horsemen under the direction of Daniel Morgan inflicted a stunning defeat on a crack British detachment led by the ruthless Banastre Tarleton, commander of Lord Cornwallis's cavalry. Although Tarleton fled the battlefield to avoid capture, the American victory effectively destroyed the light corps of the British army in the South. Stung by the loss, Cornwallis ordered a deliberate and dogged chase of the American rebels, a campaign that meandered through the wilderness and small communities of the Carolinas.

After months of retreating, the Continental army under the command of Nathanael Greene, a Rhode Island Quaker, chose to confront the British army near Guilford Courthouse, North Carolina. Although they fought with tenacity, the Americans were forced to retreat, but Cornwallis's army had suffered casualties too heavy to pursue the Continentals and instead fell back to the port city of Wilmington. Discouraged by the guerrilla tactics, Cornwallis moved north, to his final defeat at Yorktown.

In The Cowpens-Guilford Courthouse Campaign, Burke Davis provides an engaging account of the key battles in the American South, demonstrating that it was here that the strength of the Continental army's resistance to superior British forces laid the foundations for the final American victory.

Burke Davis is the author of many books, including Gray Fox: Robert E. Lee and the Civil War, Jeb Stuart: The Last Cavalier, and Black Heroes of the American Revolution. He lives in North Carolina.

| View your shopping cart | Browse Penn Press titles in American History, American Studies | Join our mailing list