Mutuality
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Mutuality
Anthropology's Changing Terms of Engagement

Roger Sanjek, Editor

384 pages | 6 x 9 | 16 illus
Cloth 2014 | ISBN 978-0-8122-4656-8 | $65.00s | £42.50 | Add to cart
Ebook 2014 | ISBN 978-0-8122-9031-8 | $65.00s | £42.50 | About | Add to cart
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"A terrific collection of essays that combines personal commentary with theoretical analysis focused on the heart of cultural anthropology. Rather than examine the more conventional concepts of 'collaboration' and 'engagement,' this collection goes deeper and examines not just the relationships that the anthropologist establishes with subjects/collaborators but also the impact of these relationships and experiences on the anthropologist's research, writing, career, values, and, most important, sense of self."—Louise Lamphere, University of New Mexico

Why do people do social-cultural anthropology? Beyond professional career motivations, what values underpin anthropologists' commitments to lengthy training, fieldwork, writing, and publication? Mutuality explores the values that anthropologists bring from their wider social worlds, including the value placed on relationships with the people they study, work with, write about and for, and communicate with more broadly.

In this volume, seventeen distinguished anthropologists draw on personal and professional histories to describe avenues to mutuality through collaborative fieldwork, community-based projects and consultations, advocacy, and museum exhibits, including the American Anthropological Association's largest public outreach ever—the RACE: Are We So Different? project. Looking critically at obstacles to reciprocally beneficial engagement, the contributors trace the discipline's past and current relations with Native Americans, indigenous peoples exhibited in early twentieth-century world's fairs, and racialized populations. The chapters range widely—across the Punjabi craft caste, Filipino Igorot, and Somali Bantu global diasporas; to the Darfur crisis and conciliation efforts in Sudan and Qatar; to applied work in Panama, Micronesia, China, and Peru. In the United States, contributors discuss their work as academic, practicing, and public anthropologists in such diverse contexts as Alaskan Yup'ik communities, multiethnic New Mexico, San Francisco's Japan Town, Oakland's Intertribal Friendship House, Southern California's produce markets, a children's ward in a Los Angeles hospital, a New England nursing home, and Washington D.C.'s National Mall. Deeply personal as well as professionally astute, Mutuality sheds new light on the issues closest to the present and future of contemporary anthropology.

Contributors: Rogaia Mustafa Abusharaf, Robert R. Alvarez, Garrick Bailey, Catherine Besteman, Parminder Bhachu, Ann Fienup-Riordan, Zibin Guo, Lane Ryo Hirabayashi, Lanita Jacobs, Susan Lobo, Yolanda T. Moses, Sylvia Rodríguez, Roger Sanjek, Renée R. Shield, Alaka Wali, Deana L. Weibel, Brett Williams.

Roger Sanjek is a J. I. Staley Prize winner, a John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellow, and author and editor of many books, including Fieldnotes: The Makings of Anthropology, Race, and The Future of Us All: Race and Neighborhood Politics in New York City. He is also author of Gray Panthers and Ethnography in Today's World, both of which are available from the University of Pennsylvania Press.

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