The Case of Peter Pan, or the Impossibility of Children's Fiction
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The Case of Peter Pan, or the Impossibility of Children's Fiction

Jacqueline Rose

208 pages | 5 1/2 x 8 1/2
Paper 1992 | ISBN 978-0-8122-1435-2 | $21.95s | £14.50 | Add to cart
A volume in the New Cultural Studies series
US, Mexico only

"Rose's searching arguments are complex and concentrated. This is the book children's literature has needed for some time. It combines scholarly examination of primary sources with historical commentary, the social history of childhood and critical theory derived from psychoanalysis. . . . It is a challenge to critics to examine the whole range of cultural practices attached to stories for children."—London Review of Books

"Everyone interested in the way in which the balance of power between adult and child in our society is expressed in the books offered by the former to the latter should read Rose's study of Peter Pan."—Times Education Supplement

Peter Pan, Jacqueline Rose contends, forces us to question what it is we are doing in the endless production and dissemination of children's fiction. In a preface, written for this edition, Rose considers some of Peter Pan's new guises and their implications. From Spielberg's Hook, to the lesbian production of the play at the London Drill Hall in 1991, to debates in the English House of Lords, to a newly claimed status as the icon of transvestite culture, Peter Pan continues to demonstrate its bizarre renewability as a cultural fetish of our times.

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