Optiques

Goulet argues that modern narrative forms are crucially structured by scientific and philosophical debates about the nature of vision.

Optiques
The Science of the Eye and the Birth of Modern French Fiction

Andrea Goulet

2006 | 280 pages | Cloth $59.95
Literature
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Table of Contents

Introduction. The Epistemology of Optics: Seeing Subjects, Modern Minds

PART I: REALISM AND THE VISIONARY EYE: BALZAC'S OPTICS OF NARRATION
1. Second Sight and the Authorial chambre noire: Les Chouans, Louis Lambert
2. "Tomber dans le phénomène": Afterimages in La Maison Nucingen and Le Bal de Sceaux
3. Alternative Optics: Séraphita, La Recherche de l'Absolu, and La Peau de Chagrin
4. "Effets de lumière," or a "Second" Second Sight: La Fille aux yeux d'or

PART II: TENEBROUS AFFAIRS: ROMANS POLICIERS AND THE DETECTING EYE
5. Cuvier, Helmholtz, and the Visual Logics of Deduction: Poe, Doyle, Gaboriau
6. Learning to See: Monsieur Lecoq and Empiricist Theories of Vision
7. Sealed Chambers and Open Eyes: Leroux's Mystère de la chambre jaune

PART III: VILLIERS, VERNE, AND CLARETIE: TOWARD A FIN-DE-SIÈCLE "OPTOGRAMMATOLOGY"
8. Death and the Retina: Claire Lenoir, L'Accusateur, and Les Frères Kip
9. Optogram Fiction: Communication, Doubt, and the Fantastic
10. Tropical Piercings: Nationalism, Atavism, and the Eye of the Corpse
11. The Fin-de-siècle Logic of the Afterimage: Hysteria, Hallucination, and Villier's L'Eve future

Epilogue. The Afterimage of Reference: Optics and the nouveau roman

Notes
Index
Acknowledgments