Paris in the Middle Ages

Centering on the streets of this metropolis, Simone Roux peers into the secret lives of people within their homes and the public world of affairs and entertainments, populating the book with laborers, shop keepers, magistrates, thieves, and strollers.

Paris in the Middle Ages

Simone Roux. Jo Ann McNamara, Translator

2009 | 272 pages | Cloth $45.00 | Paper $22.50
History
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Table of Contents

Translator's Introduction
Introduction

PART ONE: PARIS AND ITS INHABITANTS (THIRTEENTH-FIFTEENTH CENTURIES)
Chapter 1: Urban Space: Designers and Occupants
—The Enceinte Defined the City
—Urban Growth to the Thirteenth Century
—Witnesses to These Transformations
—Ordinary Parisians in Urbanization
—Paris, Home of the Free
—The Big City at the End of the Middle Ages: Prosperity and Sorrow.
—Parisians in Their City
Chapter 2: Street Scenes: Marvels and Perils of Parisian Life
—The Flattery of Arts and Letters
—Prosaic Glimpses
—Normative Documents
—The Streets of Paris: Life, Crime and Punishment
—The Streets of Paris: Religious Spaces and Political Spaces
Chapter 3: Parisians
—Provincial Immigrants
—A Self-Sustaining Population
—Strangers Assimilated and Individuals Distinguished
—Tales of Ordinary Life
—Parisians Between Modernity and Tradition

PART TWO: A KALEIDOSCOPE OF HIERARCHIES
Chapter 4: The World of Money: Haves and Have Nots
—The Parisian Great Bourgeoisie
—International Financiers and Royal Financial Agents
—The Simple Bourgeois
—From Comfort to Survival: The Poor and the Impoverished
Chapter 5: The World of Political Power
—Paris, Seat of the King and his Court
—In the King's Service
—And the Nobility?
—Agents of Power: Procurators, Sergeants, Clerks, and Others
Chapter 6: The World of the Church
—Church Grandees in the Capital
—Ecclesiastical Seigneuries
—A Clerical Patchwork Quilt
—Religious Life Set the Beat for Paris Life
—Scholars and Savants
—The World of the Church and the World of Charity

PART THREE: OF WORKS AND DAYS
Chapter 7: In Shop and Workroom: Bringing Home the Bacon
—The House as Work Space and Living Space
—The World of the Artisans
—Apprentices
—Valets or Wage-Earning Journeymen
—Masters, Jurés, and Gardes
—Outside the Crafts: Domestics and Unskilled Labor
—Disturbances in the World of Labor
Chapter 8: Networks of Solidarity: Obligatory Bonds and Chosen Ties
—The Family Group, More Restrained Yet Less Constraining
—Ordinary Parisian Women in the Time of Philip the Fair
—Voluntary Attachments and Supportive Solidarities: Associations and Confraternities
Chapter 9: Lifestyles
—Intimacy: The Individual and the Community
—Lodging from Palace to Cottage
—Enclosed Space and Open Space, Public and Private
—The Nuts and Bolts of Daily Life

Conclusion
Appendix: Parisian Taxpayers in 1297
Notes
Bibliography
Chronology
Glossary
Index