Late Modernism

Late Modernism remaps the landscape of American modernism in the early decades of the Cold War, tracing the combative debate among artists, writers, and intellectuals over the nature of the aesthetic form in an age of mass politics and mass culture.

Late Modernism
Art, Culture, and Politics in Cold War America

Robert Genter

2010 | 384 pages | Cloth $49.95
American History | Cultural Studies
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Table of Contents

Introduction. A Genealogy of Postwar American Modernism

Part I High Modernism in America: Self and Society in the Early Cold War
One. Science, Postmodernity, and the Rise of High Modernism
Two. Reconsidering the Authoritarian Personality in America: The Sociological Challenge of David Riesman
Three. Psychoanalysis and the Debate over the Democratic Personality: Norman Brown's Freudian Revisions

Part II The Revolt of Romantic Modernism: Beatniks, Action Painters, and Reichians
Four. A Question of Character: The Dramaturgy of Erving Goffman and C. Wright Mills
Five. Beyond Primitivism and the Fellahin: Receiving James Baldwin's Gift of Love
Six. Masculinity, Spontaneity, and the Act: The Bodily Ego of Jasper Johns
Seven. Rethinking the Feminine Within: The Cultural Politics of James Baldwin

Part III The Challenge of Late Modernism
Eight. Rhetoric and the Politics of Identification Writ Large: The Late Modernism of Kenneth Burke, C. Wright Mills, and Ralph Ellison

Conclusion. The Legacy of Late Modernism

Notes
Index
Acknowledgments