The Sovereign Citizen

Present-day Americans may feel secure in their citizenship, but there was a time when citizens could be denationalized. Patrick Weil examines the twentieth-century legal procedures, causes, and enforcement of denaturalization to illuminate an important and neglected dimension of American citizenship, sovereignty, and federal authority.

The Sovereign Citizen
Denaturalization and the Origins of the American Republic

Patrick Weil

2012 | 296 pages | Paper $34.95
Law | Political Science | Public Policy
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Table of Contents

Introduction 1

PART I. The Federalization of Naturalization
Chapter 1. Denaturalization, the Main Instrument of Federal Power
Chapter 2. The Installment of the Bureau of Naturalization, 1909-1926
Chapter 3. The Victory of the Federalization of Naturalization, 1926-1940

PART II. A Conditional Citizenship
Chapter 4. The First Political Denaturalization: Emma Goldman
Chapter 5. Radicals and Asians
Chapter 6. In the Largest Numbers: The Penalty of Living Abroad
Chapter 7. The Proactive Denaturalization Program During World War II

PART III. War in the Supreme Court
Chapter 8.Schneiderman: A Republican Leader Defends a Communist
Chapter 9. Baumgartner: The Program Ends, but Denaturalizationn Continues
Chapter 10. A Frozen Interlude in the Cold War
Chapter 11. Nishikawa, Perez, Trop: "The Most Important Constitutional Pronouncements of This Century"
Chapter 12. American Citizenship Is Secured: "May Perez Rest in Peace!"

Conclusion
Appendix 1. Emma Goldman, "A Woman Without a Country"
From Mother Earth (1909)
From Free Vistas (1933)

Appendix 2. Chiefs of the Naturalization Bureau and Evolution of Departmental Responsibilities

Appendix 3. Naturalization Cancellations in the United States, 1907-1973

Appendix 4. Americans Expatriated, by Grounds and Year, 1945-1977

Appendix 5. Supreme Court and Other Important Court Decisions Related to Denaturalization and Nonvoluntary Expatriation from Schneiderman and Participating Supreme Court Justices
Notes
Archival Sources and Interviews
Index
Acknowledgments