Parrots and Nightingales

Studying the medieval tradition of quoting verbatim from troubadour songs, Sarah Kay explores works produced along the arc of the northern Mediterranean in the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries, illuminating how this tradition influenced medieval literary history and the development of European subjectivity.

Parrots and Nightingales
Troubadour Quotations and the Development of European Poetry

Sarah Kay

2013 | 472 pages | Cloth $79.95
Literature
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Table of Contents

Note on References, Translations, and Abbreviations

Introduction: Quotation, Knowledge, Change

PART I. PIONEERING TROUBADOUR QUOTATION
Chapter 1. Rhyme and Reason: Quotation in Raimon Vidal de Besalú's Razos de trobar and the Grammars of the Vidal Tradition
Chapter 2. Quotation, Memory, and Connoisseurship in the Novas of Raimon Vidal de Besalú
Chapter 3. Starting Afresh with Quotation in the Vidas and Razos
Chapter 4. Soliciting Quotation in Florilegia: Attribution, Authority, and Freedom

PART II. PARROTS AND NIGHTINGALES
Chapter 5. The Nightingales' Way: Poetry as French Song in Jean Renart's Guillaume de Dole
Chapter 6. The Parrots' Way: The Novas del papagai from Catalonia to Italy

PART III. TRANSFORMING TROUBADOUR QUOTATION
Chapter 7. Songs Within Songs: Subjectivity and Performance in Bertolome Zorzi (74.9) and Jofre de Foixà (304.1)
Chapter 8. Perilous Quotations: Language, Desire, and Knowledge in Matfre Ermengau's Breviari d'amor
Chapter 9. Dante's Ex-Appropriation of the Troubadours in De vulgari eloquentia and the Divina commedia
Chapter 10. The Leys d'amors: Phasing Out the antics troubadors and Ushering in the New Toulousain Poetics
Chapter 11. Petrarch's "Lasso me": Changing the Subject

Conclusion

Appendices
Notes
Bibliography of Printed and Electronic Sources
Index
Acknowledgments