After Civil War

After Civil War compares the postconflict reconstruction projects of Bosnia, Cyprus, Finland, Greece, Kosovo, Northern Ireland, the Republic of Ireland, Spain, and Turkey to explore how former combatants and their supporters learn to coexist as one nation in the aftermath of ethnopolitical or ideological violence.

After Civil War
Division, Reconstruction, and Reconciliation in Contemporary Europe

Bill Kissane, Editor

2014 | 312 pages | Cloth $69.95
Political Science | Public Policy
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Table of Contents

Introduction
—Bill Kissane

PART I. RECONSTRUCTING THE NATION IN INTERWAR EUROPE
Chapter 1. The Legacy of Civil War of 1918 in Finland
—Risto Alapuro
Chapter 2. "A Nation Once Again"? Electoral Competition and the Reconstruction of National Identity After the Irish Civil War, 1922-1923
—Bill Kissane
Chapter 3. State, Nation, and Violence in Spanish Civil War Reconstruction
—Michael Richards

PART II. RECONSTRCTION WITHOUT CONFLICT RESOLUTION
Chapter 4. Enemies of the Nation—A Nation of Enemies: The Long Greek Civil War
—Riki van Boeschoten
Chapter 5. Political Contention and the Reconstruction of Greek Identity in Cyprus, 1960-23
—Chares Demetriou
Chapter 6. Under (Re)Construction: The State, the Production of Identity, and the Countryside in the Kurdistan Region in Turkey
—Joost Jongerden

PART III. RECONSTRUCTION UNDER EXTERNAL SUPERVISION
Chapter 7. Ethnicity Pays: The Political Economy of Postconflict Nationalism in Bosnia-Herzegovina
—Denisa Kostovicova and Vesna Bojicic-Dzelilovic
Chapter 8. Nationalism and Beyond: Memory and Identity in Postwar Kosovo/Kosova
—Ruth Seifert
Chapter 9. Reconstruction Without Reconciliation: Is Northern Ireland a "Model"?
—James Hughes

Conclusion
—Bill Kissane

Index
Acknowledgments