The Internet, Social Media, and a Changing China

The Internet and social media are pervasive and transformative forces in contemporary China. The Internet, Social Media, and a Changing China explores the changing relationship between China's Internet and social media and its society, politics, legal system, and foreign relations.

The Internet, Social Media, and a Changing China

Edited by Jacques deLisle, Avery Goldstein, and Guobin Yang

2016 | 296 pages | Paper $49.95
Asian Studies | Political Science
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Table of Contents

Introduction: The Internet, Social Media, and a Changing China
—Jacques deLisle, Avery Goldstein, and Guobin Yang

Chapter 1: The Coevolution of the Internet, (Un)Civil Society, and Authoritarianism in China
—Min Jiang
Chapter 2: Connectivity, Engagement, and Witnessing on China's Weibo
—Marina Svensson
Chapter 3: New Media Empowerment and State-Society Relations in China
—Shi and Guobin Yang
Chapter 4: The Privilege of Speech in New Media: Conceptualizing China's Communications Law in the Internet Age
—Rogier Creemers
Chapter 5: Embedding Law into Politics in China's Networked Public Sphere
—Ya-Wen Lei and Daniel Xiaodan Zhou
Chapter 6: Microbloggers' Battle for Legal Justice in China
—Anne S. Y. Cheung
Chapter 7: Public Opinion and Chinese Foreign Policy: New Media and Old Puzzles
—Dalei Jie
Chapter 8: Social Media, Nationalist Protests, and China's Japan Policy: The Diaoyu Islands Controversy, 2012-13
—Peter Gries, Derek Steiger, and Wang Tao
Chapter 9: Going Out and Texting Home: New Media and China's Citizens Abroad
—James Reilly
Chapter 10: Images of the DPRK in China's New Media: How Foreign Policy Attitudes Are Connected to Domestic Ideologies in China
—Chuanjie Zhang

Notes
List of Contributors
Index
Acknowledgments