Indecent Exposure

In Indecent Exposure, Nicole Nolan Sidhu explores obscene comedy in the literary and visual culture of fourteenth- and fifteenth-century England. She proposes that Middle English writers used obscene comedy to grapple with the disturbances their society experienced in the century and a half following the Black Death.

Indecent Exposure
Gender, Politics, and Obscene Comedy in Middle English Literature

Nicole Nolan Sidhu

2016 | 320 pages | Cloth $69.95
Literature | Women's Studies/Gender Studies
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Table of Contents

Note on the Fabliaux
Introduction. Obscenity in Medieval Culture and Literature

PART I. FOURTEENTH-CENTURY PIONEERS
Chapter 1. Comedy and Critique: Obscenity and Langland's Reproof of Established Powers in Piers Plowman
Chapter 2. Chaucer's Poetics of the Obscene: Classical Narrative and Fabliau Politics in Fragment One of the Canterbury Tales and The Legend of Good Women

PART II. FIFTEENTH-CENTURY HEIRS
Chapter 3. The Henpecked Subject: Misogyny, Poetry, and Masculine Community in the Writing of John Lydgate
Chapter 4. "Ryth Wikked": Christian Ethics and the Unruly Holy Woman in the Book of Margery Kempe
Chapter 5. Women's Work, Companionate Marriage, and Mass Death in the Biblical Drama

Conclusion. Lessons of the Medieval Obscene
Notes
Bibliography
Index
Acknowledgments