A Natural History of the Romance Novel

Pamela Regis argues that the romance novel, the most popular but least respected of literary genres, does not enslave women but celebrates their freedom and joy. Regis provides critics with an expanded vocabulary for discussing a genre that is both classic and contemporary, sexy and entertaining.

A Natural History of the Romance Novel

Pamela Regis

2003 | 240 pages | Cloth $24.95 | Paper $21.95
Literature
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Table of Contents

Preface: The Most Popular, Least Respected Literary Genre

PART I. CRITICS AND THE ROMANCE NOVEL
1. The Romance Novel and Women's Bondage
2. In Defense of the Romance Novel

PART II. THE ROMANCE NOVEL DEFINED
3. The Definition
4. The Definition Expanded
5. The Genre's Limits

PART III. THE ROMANCE NOVEL, 1740-1908
6. Writing the Romance Novel's History
7. The First Best Seller: Pamela, 1740
8. The Best Romance Novel Ever Written: Pride and Prejudice, 1813
9. Freedom and Rochester: Jane Eyre, 1847
10. The Romance Form in the Victorian Multiplot Novel: Framley Parsonage, 1861
11. The Ideal Romance Novel: A Room with a View, 1908

PART IV. THE TWENTIETH CENTURY ROMANCE NOVEL
12. The Popular Romance Novel in the Twentieth Century
13. Civil Contracts: Georgette Heyer
14. Courtship and Suspense: Mary Stewart
15. Harlequin, Silhouette, and the Americanization of the Popular Romance Novel: Janet Dailey
16. Dangerous Men: Jayne Ann Krentz
17. One Man, One Woman: Nora Roberts

Conclusion

Works Cited
Index
Acknowledgments