Academic Statistics
Academic Records

Academic statistics measure students' progress and success in course work. In SRS, academic statistics are calculated and maintained:

- by term
- by career
- by transcript

In SRS, CREDITS may refer to any of the following acceptable "currencies" for course work.

- course units
- semester hours
- credit units

The credit value of any individual course section is always expressed in the currency that is applicable to the school of the course. For example, all Law School courses are in semester hours. All courses on transcripts show the credit value in the currency of the course.

For purposes of calculating academic statistics, maximum student credit load, full-time and part-time status and other measures involving students' credits, SRS converts courses in the student records to the currency applicable to the divisions of the student. However, the academic record and transcript always retain the credit value of courses in their original currency.

"Registered credits" are the number of credits for which a student is enrolled in any given term.

"Quality credits" are the number of credits for which students are enrolled that count toward their grade point average. The determination of whether or not a credit will be a "quality credit" can only be made AFTER the course is graded.

Example: A 1 CU (course unit) course with a grade of an A counts as
1 quality credit; a 1 CU course with a grade of an F counts as 1
quality credit because a course with a grade of an F is included in
the grade point average; a 1 CU course with a grade of P (pass) DOES
NOT count as a quality credit because a grade of P is not included
in the grade point average.

"Earned credits" are credits which are counted toward degree completion and which are successfully completed. The determination of whether or not a credit will be an "earned credit" is usually made AFTER the course is graded.

Examples: A 1 CU (course unit) course with a grade of an A counts
as 1 earned credit; a 1 CU course with a grade of an F DOES NOT
count as an earned credit because a course with a grade of F is not
successfully completed; a 1 CU course with a grade of P (pass)
counts as 1 earned credit because a grade of P is successfully
completed.

"Quality points" for a given course are the number of quality credits multiplied by the mathematical equivalent credit of the grade. They are used only in the calculation of GPA (grade point average).

Examples: A 3 SH (semester hour) course with a grade of an A
(numerical equivalent value of 4) has 12 quality points. A 1 CU
(credit unit) course with a grade of A has 4 quality points.

A grade point average (GPA) is calculated by dividing the total quality points by the total quality credits.

GPAs are maintained on the internal academic record for all students but are not necessarily printed on the transcripts.

GPAs are calculated on the basis of career and transcript. GPAs are calculated and displayed on Screen 118, Academic Statistics, for each career of a student.

GPAs are not printed on transcripts for the following careers:

- Annenberg, master's degree program
- Graduate School of Education, master's and doctoral programs
- Graduate School of Fine Arts, master's degree programs
- Law School
- School of Social Work
- Wharton Graduate Division

For more information on grading and grade types, see "Grade Types".

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