• A Sky View of Penn’s Vibrant Urban Campus

    A Sky View of Penn’s Vibrant Urban Campus

    A bird’s-eye view of Penn’s campus provides a unique perspective on some of the University’s iconic structures, such as Huntsman Hall, Franklin Field, and the brick pathways that lace College Green.[youtube]http://www.youtube.

  • Tapping the History of Philly’s Trees

    Tapping the History of Philly’s Trees

    The Woodlands, a 54-acre historic site and cemetery in University City, is the final resting place for many prominent Philadelphians. Paul Philippe Cret, the architect, planner, and former professor in what was then called Penn’s School of Fine Arts is buried there, as are several members of the Drexel family, and renowned American painter Thomas Eakins.

  • Penn Museum Helps Put An Irish Murder Mystery To Rest

    Penn Museum Helps Put An Irish Murder Mystery To Rest

    Fifty-seven Irish workers set sail for the United States in April of 1832 to work at Duffy’s Cut, a Pennsylvania Railroad construction site in Malvern, a city about 20 miles outside of Philadelphia. The workers arrived in Philadelphia in June.

  • Penn Receives Highest Presidential Recognition for Community Service

    Penn Receives Highest Presidential Recognition for Community Service

    Honored for its commitment to civic and local engagement through community service and service learning, Penn was one of five institutions in the country to receive the Presidential Award in the 2012 President’s Higher Education Community Service Honor Roll.

  • W. E. B. Du Bois’ Profound Cultural Influence

    W. E. B. Du Bois’ Profound Cultural Influence

    During his lifetime, W. E. B. Du Bois was a sociologist, historian, author, public intellectual, and civil rights activist. Today, Du Bois is widely considered one of the most important scholars of his generation, who still influences researchers, according to Tukufu Zuberi, professor of sociology and the Lasry Family Professor of Race Relations in the School of Arts and Sciences.