Teach-In 2018

The |
Of Knowledge

When

March 18th-22nd, 2018

Sunday-Thursday

Where

Philadelphia
University of Pennsylvania

24

Events

5

Days

15

Venues

1

Campus

Teach-In 2018 Schedule and RSVP

Registration is encouraged for logistical planning purposes only.

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TEACH-IN 2018

March 18th-22nd, University of Pennsylvania

From March 18-22, 2018, Penn Faculty will convene a Teach-In on “the production, dissemination, and use of knowledge.” Events will be free and open to the public at locations all around campus. This is Penn’s first Teach-In since March 1969.

It is no secret that in a time of a great burgeoning of knowledge we also face in the body politic a growing unease about epistemology, the provenance of knowledge, and the course of the Academy. Faced with these troubled times, Penn’s Faculty Senate is organizing an historic pan-university Teach-In on the rigors of knowledge creation, the difficulties encountered in communicating it, and the use to which it is put and how it can impact society.

It is generally agreed that the university's primary purpose is the advancement of knowledge to improve human life. Certainly, the idea of knowledge for the continuous betterment of the human condition motivated Benjamin Franklin when he founded the College of Philadelphia, which became the University of Pennsylvania. At various times in Penn's history, it has appropriately taken stock of its progress towards realizing Franklin's vision. The Teach-In on the Production, Dissemination, and Use of Knowledge is such an occasion.

The last Teach-In at Penn, termed the Day of Conscience, occurred on March 4, 1969. Over 1,200 university students participated in workshops, lectures, and symposia that focused on both the role of the university in society, and the use and misuse of scientific knowledge. The Day of Conscience occurred in the midst of the Civil Rights Movement and the Vietnam War. It also occurred in the wake of the February 1969 student protest at a University City Science Center construction site that escalated into a six-day peaceful sit-in at College Hall supported by area-wide college and university students and local black activists. The role of the university in society was deeply questioned in the 1960s. The present situation in our society, indeed in societies throughout the world, which is marked by increasing racism, intolerance, xenophobia, and attacks on science, knowledge, and higher education itself, requires a similar moment of discussion, reflection, and informed action. Appropriate to our Franklinian heritage, this weeklong Teach-In on the Production, Dissemination, and Use of Knowledge is designed to be part of a deepening, ongoing conversation on how Penn in particular and universities in general might best fulfill their crucial intellectual and societal missions.

See the March 1969 article Beginning Anew here for more historical information.

A Brief History of Penn Teach-Ins, by Ira Harkavy and John Puckett

Further reading: Chapter 2 in Knowledge for Social Change (2017). Temple University Press.

Coordinated by the University of Pennsylvania Faculty Senate, the effort spans all of Penn’s twelve schools in a collective endeavor by staff, students, and faculty. We are also opening our borders to invite the civic community, schools, local organizations, and policy makers, both in Philadelphia and in our capitals, into our campus to be a part of this dialog.

Schedule of Events

Knowledge Production, Communication & Impact in the 21st Century
Penn Museum
How Do We Know?
An afternoon of learning and fun in the Penn Museum

Knowledge and understanding come in many forms, and the Penn Museum invites you to explore how we know what we know with gallery talks and tactile activities for all ages. Try out stone tools, textiles, and ceramics in an experimental archaeology station to understand more about their use and craftsmanship. Practice your archaeological science skills with our microscopes and test samples. Study replica artifacts up close and personal with hands-on activities. Learn with our experts about their research and archaeological digs and studies and see how that research gets translated into Museum exhibitions. Challenge your newfound knowledge in a mobile, museum-wide scavenger hunt of discovery with prizes!

For further information contact:

Add to Calendar 03/18/2018 01:00 PM 03/18/2018 4:00 PM America/New_York How Do We Know? An afternoon of learning and fun in the Penn Museum Learn with our experts about their research and archaeological digs and studies and see how that research gets translated into Museum exhibitions. Challenge your newfound knowledge in a mobile, museum-wide scavenger hunt of discovery-- with prizes! Penn Museum

Penn Museum
Monument Lab
Civic Studio on Public Space (An Exhibition)

Throughout the Teach-In, Monument Lab collaborators will present research projects from Penn students in the Civic Studio course, including final projects that offers guidance on the creative and civic impulses of monument making; a first glimpse at the public proposals and data sets collected by students at the labs across the city; a takeaway self-guided tour of the Schuylkill River-as-Monument;  and a special virtual reality tour of the exhibition's prototype monuments produced by Penn Libraries' PennImmersive.

What is an appropriate monument for the current city of Philadelphia? To reflect on this line of inquiry, Monument Lab – a research team led by Ken Lum (Professor and Chair, Fine Arts Department at PennDesign) and Paul Farber (Managing Director, Penn Program in Environmental Humanities), with collaborators in the School of Arts and Sciences, PennDesign, Penn Libraries, Penn Institute for Urban Research, Price Lab for Digital Humanities, and dozens of other municipal partners across the city – staged a two-month citywide public art and history exhibition with Mural Arts Philadelphia last Fall. Over 200,000 people engaged with the exhibition across the city, which featured prototype monuments at City Hall, iconic public squares, and neighborhood parks, as imagined by leading public artists focused on themes of social justice and solidarity. Additionally, Monument Lab opened adjacent learning labs at these sites which were operated by teams consisting of local educators, high school fellows, and Penn students enrolled in a Netter Center-supported class "Civic Studio course." Through their efforts, close to 5,000 speculative public monument proposals were gathered from participants. As an outcome to this exhibition, the research team will produce a forthcoming Report to the City, share an open data set of all of the proposals on OpenDataPhilly, and extend learnings with continued collaborative installations and projects in cities aimed at unearthing the next generation of monuments.

Philadelphia is a city full of monuments and memorials. Philadelphia is also a city full of monumental histories, many of which are little known, obscured, or simply unacknowledged. These underrepresented histories often exist in tension with officially acknowledged narratives. As a society, through this moment of intensity and uncertainty around public monuments—especially those that symbolize the enduring legacies of racial injustice and social inequality—we are reminded that we must find new, critical ways to reflect on the monuments we have inherited and imagine future monuments we have yet to build.

Partners:
Penn Fine Arts
PennDesign
Penn Program in Environmental Humanities
Penn Libraries
Netter Center
Penn Institute for Urban Research
Price Lab for Digital Humanities

Add to Calendar 03/19/2018 10:00 AM 03/19/2018 5:00 PM America/New_York Monument Lab-Civic Studio on Public Space (An Exhibition)

Throughout the Teach-In, Monument Lab collaborators will present research projects from Penn students in the Civic Studio course, including final projects that offers guidance on the creative and civic impulses of monument making; a first glimpse at the public proposals and data sets collected by students at the labs across the city; a takeaway self-guided tour of the Schuylkill River-as-Monument;  and a special virtual reality tour of the exhibition's prototype monuments produced by Penn Libraries' PennImmersive.

What is an appropriate monument for the current city of Philadelphia? To reflect on this line of inquiry, Monument Lab – a research team led by Ken Lum (Professor and Chair, Fine Arts Department at PennDesign) and Paul Farber (Managing Director, Penn Program in Environmental Humanities), with collaborators in the School of Arts and Sciences, PennDesign, Penn Libraries, Penn Institute for Urban Research, Price Lab for Digital Humanities, and dozens of other municipal partners across the city – staged a two-month citywide public art and history exhibition with Mural Arts Philadelphia last Fall. Over 200,000 people engaged with the exhibition across the city, which featured prototype monuments at City Hall, iconic public squares, and neighborhood parks, as imagined by leading public artists focused on themes of social justice and solidarity. Additionally, Monument Lab opened adjacent learning labs at these sites which were operated by teams consisting of local educators, high school fellows, and Penn students enrolled in a Netter Center-supported class "Civic Studio course." Through their efforts, close to 5,000 speculative public monument proposals were gathered from participants. As an outcome to this exhibition, the research team will produce a forthcoming Report to the City, share an open data set of all of the proposals on OpenDataPhilly, and extend learnings with continued collaborative installations and projects in cities aimed at unearthing the next generation of monuments.

Philadelphia is a city full of monuments and memorials. Philadelphia is also a city full of monumental histories, many of which are little known, obscured, or simply unacknowledged. These underrepresented histories often exist in tension with officially acknowledged narratives. As a society, through this moment of intensity and uncertainty around public monuments—especially those that symbolize the enduring legacies of racial injustice and social inequality—we are reminded that we must find new, critical ways to reflect on the monuments we have inherited and imagine future monuments we have yet to build.

Partners:
Penn Fine Arts
PennDesign
Penn Program in Environmental Humanities
Penn Libraries
Netter Center
Penn Institute for Urban Research
Price Lab for Digital Humanities

Addams Hall
Learn More

Penn Libraries

Van Pelt Library
The Penn Libraries:
Critical Engagement with Knowledge

The Libraries has a pivotal role in the creation, dissemination, and use of knowledge as we provide the resources that support Penn research at all levels of scholarship, work with students to help them navigate the complex information environment, and teach them the skills they need to critically assess the materials they discover.

The Libraries will complement the event's panels and lectures by focusing on the process of research and the critical evaluation of scholarly materials with a day of interactive opportunities for students as they enter Van Pelt-Dietrich Library Center. Drawing from the themes of the Teach-In (firearms violence, vaccine safety, immigration, and climate and environment) the Libraries will present four posters illustrating research paths, methodologies and Penn Libraries resources.

Join us on a drop-in basis throughout the day to learn more about good research practices, the diversity of approaches and tools, and critical evaluation skills.

Library staff will be available throughout the day to lead short activities and provide giveaways to participants. Look for us in the lobby area of Van Pelt Library. Posters will remain on display throughout the week and may be available in the Museum and Biomed Libraries.

Add to Calendar 03/19/2018 8:30 AM 03/19/2018 11:59 PM America/New_York Critical Engagement with Knowledge: Library Poster Event

The Libraries has a pivotal role in the creation, dissemination, and use of knowledge as we provide the resources that support Penn research at all levels of scholarship, work with students to help them navigate the complex information environment, and teach them the skills they need to critically assess the materials they discover.

The Libraries will complement the event's panels and lectures by focusing on the process of research and the critical evaluation of scholarly materials with a day of interactive opportunities for students as they enter Van Pelt-Dietrich Library Center. Drawing from the themes of the Teach-In (firearms violence, vaccine safety, immigration, and climate and environment) the Libraries will present four posters illustrating research paths, methodologies and Penn Libraries resources.

Join us on a drop-in basis throughout the day to learn more about good research practices, the diversity of approaches and tools, critical evaluation skills.

Library staff will be available throughout the day to lead short activities and provide giveaways to participants. Look for us in the lobby area of Van Pelt Library. Posters will remain on display throughout the week and may be available in the Museum and Biomed Libraries.

Van Pelt Library

Jim English

David Eng

Sebastian Gil-Riano

Susan Lindee

Quayshawn Spencer
Teaching Race:
A Roundtable

The popular media sometimes portray American universities as places where discussion of racial matters is conducted along narrow, politically correct lines of thinking, with humanities professors in particular more concerned to indoctrinate their students than to encourage fresh thinking. The reality is of course quite different. Current research on race is varied and complex, as are the styles and practices of teaching in today's humanities and humanistic social sciences. The faculty on this panel are doing leading-edge research on the cultural, philosophical, historical, and political dimensions of race and racial science, and teaching their research to undergraduates across the spectrum of humanities and science majors. How do they communicate the complexities of their research to a diverse constituency of college students, many of whom may find the very topic of race difficult to discuss?

The first part of the panel will consist of brief introductory remarks. Each professor will speak for five or six minutes about some aspect of their research and writing on race, and describe how they have attempted to incorporate it into their teaching. The second part of the panel will be a moderated roundtable in which the faculty respond to each other's remarks and field questions from the audience. As a highly fraught and divisive topic in our society, race presents special challenges to educators. This panel will highlight the rigor, creativity, and passion with which Penn's faculty are meeting that challenge.

Moderator:
Jim English, John Welsh Centennial Professor of English
Director, Wolf Humanities Center

Panelists:
David Eng, Richard L. Fisher Professor of English and Asian American Studies
Sebastián Gil-Riaño, Assistant Professor, History and Sociology of Science
Susan Lindee,Professor and Chair, History and Sociology of Science
Quayshawn Spencer, Assistant Professor, Philosophy

Add to Calendar 03/19/2018 10:00 AM 03/19/2018 11:30 AM America/New_York Teaching Race: A Roundtable The popular media sometimes portray American universities as places where discussion of racial matters is conducted along narrow, politically correct lines of thinking, with humanities professors in particular more concerned to indoctrinate their students than to encourage fresh thinking. The reality is of course quite different. Current research on race is varied and complex, as are the styles and practices of teaching in today's humanities and humanistic social sciences. The faculty on this panel are doing leading-edge research on the cultural, philosophical, historical, and political dimensions of race and racial science, and teaching their research to undergraduates across the spectrum of humanities and science majors. How do they communicate the complexities of their research to a diverse constituency of college students, many of whom may find the very topic of race difficult to discuss? Van Pelt Library: Class of '55

Monument Lab
Monument Lab
Opening Ceremony

Join the Monument Lab for an Opening Reception, or drop by anytime during the Teach-In week to enjoy the exhibit.

Add to Calendar 03/19/2018 12:00 PM 03/19/2018 2:00 PM America/New_York Monument Lab-Opening Ceremony Content TBD Addams Hall

Maiken Scott

Paul Offit

David Weiner

Joe Capella

Damon Centola

Justin Bernstein

C. Neill Epperson
Vaccine Denial
A World-Wide Public Health Concern

The discovery and wide implementation of vaccinations against communicable disease is touted as one of modern medicine's greatest breakthroughs for global public health. Potentially lethal diseases such as polio, diphtheria and smallpox are now exceptionally rare in the United States and in many other developed nations. Education and wide-spread vaccination campaigns are to be credited for much of our success. However, gains made in vaccination awareness and acceptance are currently being threatened by a minority of vocal individuals who express concern that vaccination is responsible for the uptick in autism diagnoses. Though the 1998 study from the United Kingdom suggesting a link between a common childhood vaccination and autism was quickly debunked and the first author of that study was found to have had a conflict of interest and subsequently lost his medical license, up to a quarter of citizens polled continued to believe in the link 5 years later. Vaccine denial is just one example of how biomedical findings can become engrained in the consciousness of the public to the point that future research, even research that is more rigorous and accurately negates the original finding, is not considered valid or 'believable'. In most cases the change in knowledge is not due to research malpractice, but to advancements in scientific methods and technologies. Inconsistencies in biomedical research findings overwhelms the public, contributing to the notion that 'the experts don't know what they are doing' because they keep 'changing their minds'. Importantly, the media often latches onto the most sensational of biomedical findings and fails to instill the same kind of passion and balance into their coverage of future research which elaborates on or contradicts the previous findings. The proposed panel will be sponsored by the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and consists of the following speakers representing diverse areas of pedagogy and expertise in the topic of vaccine denial, public understanding of medical discoveries and the role of the media in appropriately educating the public regarding biomedical research. As such, this panel is consonant with the overarching goals of the 2018 Penn Teach-In: The Academy in the 21st Century: Production, Dissemination and Use of Knowledge.

Event Format: Panel with Moderated Q&A

Introduction: C. Neill Epperson, M.D. (Professor of Psychiatry, Perelman School of Medicine)

Panel Moderator: Maiken Scott, Senior Reporter, WHYY and The Pulse

Panelists:

  • 1. Paul Offit, M.D.,'(Director, Vaccine Education Center, Professor of Pediatrics, CHOP) Overview of Vaccine Safety and the Origins of Vaccine Denial.
  • 2. David Weiner, Ph.D. (Exec VP & Director, Vaccine and Immunotherapy Center, Wistar Institute) Developing New Vaccine Technologies in a Complex World
  • 3. Joe Cappella, Ph.D. (Professor of Communication, Annenberg School for Communication) Mechanisms of Social Influence in Vaccine Confidence
  • 4. Damon Centola, Ph.D. (Associate Professor, Annenberg School for Communication) How Vaccine Attitudes Spread: Network Dynamics of Behavior Change
  • 5. Justin Bernstein (Doctoral Candidate in Philosophy, School of Arts and Science) Race and Vaccine Acceptance
  • 6. Maiken Scott, (Senior Reporter, WHYY and The Pulse) The Media: Partner or Foe in Dissemination of Biomedical Research Findings

Add to Calendar 03/19/2018 12:00 PM 03/19/2018 1:30 PM America/New_York Vaccine Denial: A World-Wide Public Health Concern The discovery and wide implementation of vaccinations against communicable disease is touted as one of modern medicine's greatest breakthroughs for global public health. Potentially lethal diseases such as polio, diphtheria and smallpox are now exceptionally rare in the United States and in many other developed nations. Education and wide-spread vaccination campaigns are to be credited for much of our success. However, gains made in vaccination awareness and acceptance are currently being threatened by a minority of vocal individuals who express concern that vaccination is responsible for the uptick in autism diagnoses. Though the 1998 study from the United Kingdom suggesting a link between a common childhood vaccination and autism was quickly debunked and the first author of that study was found to have had a conflict of interest and subsequently lost his medical license, up to a quarter of citizens polled continued to believe in the link 5 years later. Vaccine denial is just one example of how biomedical findings can become engrained in the consciousness of the public to the point that future research, even research that is more rigorous and accurately negates the original finding, is not considered valid or 'believable'. In most cases the change in knowledge is not due to research malpractice, but to advancements in scientific methods and technologies. Inconsistencies in biomedical research findings overwhelms the public, contributing to the notion that 'the experts don't know what they are doing' because they keep 'changing their minds'. Importantly, the media often latches onto the most sensational of biomedical findings and fails to instill the same kind of passion and balance into their coverage of future research which elaborates on or contradicts the previous findings. The proposed panel will be sponsored by the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and consists of the following speakers representing diverse areas of pedagogy and expertise in the topic of vaccine denial, public understanding of medical discoveries and the role of the media in appropriately educating the public regarding biomedical research. As such, this panel is consonant with the overarching goals of the 2018 Penn Teach-In: The Academy in the 21st Century: Production, Dissemination and Use of Knowledge. Smilow: Rubenstein Auditorium

Therese Richmond
Doublas Wiebe
Dan Romer
Daniel Holena
John MacDonald
Firearm Violence
Science, Policy & Politics

Firearm violence is a contentious societal problem and carries a significant public health burden. Dialogue is polarized and funding for science is restricted. Yet researchers from many disciplines at Penn focus their research on reducing firearm violence and improving outcomes of violent injuries – by conducting rigorous science and producing factual information.

This event will include a series of case scenarios highlighting the intersection of science, policy, and politics, and facilitate an open respectful and scholarly conversation about how to decrease the burden of firearm violence.

Speakers include:
Therese Richmond, PhD, CRNP, FAAN
Andrea B. Laporte Endowed Professor, School of Nursing

Douglas Wiebe, PhD
Associate Professor, Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Perelman School of Medicine

Dan Romer, PhD
Research Director, Annenberg Public Policy Center

Daniel Holena, MD, MSCE, FACS
Assistant Professor, Surgery, Perelman School of Medicine

John MacDonald, PhD, MA
Professor, Criminology and Sociology, School of Arts and Sciences

Add to Calendar 03/19/2018 03:00 PM 03/19/2018 04:30 PM America/New_York Firearm Violence: Science, Policy & Politics Firearm violence is a contentious societal problem and carries a significant public health burden. Dialogue is polarized and funding for science is restricted. Yet researchers from many disciplines at Penn focus their research on reducing firearm violence and improving outcomes of violent injuries – by conducting rigorous science and producing factual information. Terrace Room, Claudia Cohen Hall

Tracey Matisak

John Jackson

Dorothy Roberts

Sarah Tishkoff
Teach-In Opening Ceremony
Knowledge Production, Communication & Impact in the 21st Century

It is no secret that in a time of a great burgeoning of knowledge we also face in the body politic a growing unease about epistemology, the provenance of knowledge, and the course of the Academy. Faced with these troubled times, Penn's Faculty Senate is organising an unprecedented pan-university Teach-In on the'rigours'of knowledge creation, the difficulties encountered in communicating it, and the use to which it is put and how it can impact society.''The effort spans all of Penn's twelve schools in a collective endeavour by staff, students, and faculty, and we are opening our borders to invite the civic community, schools, local organisations, and policy makers, both in Philadelphia and in our capitals, into our campus to be a part of this dialogue.' A half-century after the campus teach-ins during the social unrest of the '60s, it seemed entirely appropriate that we recreate a community dialogue on knowledge and the role of the Academy: how should the university engage with'the'community and the nation in the 21st century? 'This historic faculty-sponsored initiative will take place during March 18'22, 2018.

Moderator:

Tracey Matisak
Ms. Matisak has more than 20 years of major market radio and television experience and spearheads special projects for WHYY throughout the year. These include anchoring election coverage and hosting live events on WHYY, PBS and National Public Radio. She has been an occasional contributor to PBS'S Nightly Business Report. Prior to WHYY, she served for 12 years at FOX Philadelphia. She hosted FOX's Good Day Philadelphia and served as an Anchor and Reporter for the FOX Ten O'Clock News. She has also appeared on the Home and Garden Network and has served as an anchor and reporter for several Philadelphia radio stations, including KYW Newsradio. Ms. Matisak serves as Member of Multicultural Advisory Board at Star Toplin. Ms. Matisak is a member of the adjunct faculty in Temple's department of Broadcasting, Telecommunications and Mass Media. Ms. Matisak is a Distinguished Alumni of Temple University. She has also won the Sarah Award for Excellence in Broadcasting and was named Communicator of the Year by the National Black MBA Association. Ms. Matisak is an award-winning journalist, a dynamic speaker and trainer and a member of WHYY's News and Public Affairs team. Ms. Matisak is a graduate of Temple University.

Panelists:

John Jackson, Jr.
A renowned cultural anthropologist, Professor John Jackson is Dean of the School of Social Policy & Practice and the Richard Perry University Professor of Communication, Anthropology, and Africana Studies with appointments in the Annenberg School for Communication, the School of Arts & Sciences, and the School of Social Policy & Practice. His research defies traditional categories, incorporating multiple fields in each inquiry: technology and religious studies; culture and economics; anthropology and new media; Africana studies and linguistics. Drawn to the power of storytelling through image and sound, Jackson is leading efforts to bring film into academia. He has produced numerous visual anthropologies: feature-length documentaries, fictional movies and short films that have won prestigious awards and screened around the world.

Dorothy Roberts
Professor Dorothy Roberts is the George A. Weiss Professor of Law & Sociology, the Raymond Pace & Sadie Tanner Mossell Alexander Professor of Civil Rights, and Professor of Africana Studies. She is also the founding Director of the Program on Race, Science and Society. With appointments in Penn Law and the School of Arts & Sciences, Roberts works at the intersection of law, social justice, science and health to explore the role of race in scientific research, biotechnological innovations, and health services and outcomes. The program builds on her head-turning critique of race-based genomic science'an argument that racial identity is a social and political invention, not a biological fact coded in DNA. The program illustrates Roberts' ability to change national conversations, bring about positive social change and put research into practice in public service.

Sarah Tishkoff
Professor Sarah A. Tishkoff is the David and Lyn Silfen University Professor in Genetics and Biology. She holds appointments in the Perelman School of Medicine and the School of Arts & Sciences, and works at the intersection of biomedicine, human genetics, evolutionary genetics and anthropology. Overcoming hazards in rural Africa, Sarah Tishkoff has created the world's largest database of African diversity derived from genetic samples from more than 9,000 people from 200 distinct ethnic groups. Tishkoff's scholarship expands understanding of ancestry and culture with data gleaned from genetics and metabolism, and may yield insights on causes and possible new treatments for disease. Tishkoff is known for her novel integration of field, lab and computational research with linguistics and anthropology. Through her studies of indigenous populations, Tishkoff hopes to identify genetic factors in resistance to diseases such as malaria and tuberculosis, and to glean insights to help prevent diabetes and heart disease.

Add to Calendar 03/19/2018 5:00 PM 03/19/2018 6:30 PM America/New_York Teach-In Opening Content TBD Fitts Auditorium, Law School

Teach-In Opening Reception
Information Pending

Attendees of the Opening Event are invited to remain for a reception with panelists and guests.

Add to Calendar 03/19/2018 6:30 PM 03/19/2018 7:00 PM America/New_York Teach-In Opening Reception Content TBD Location TBD
Opening attendees only
Panelist
[RE]ACTION: Empowering the Future Leaders in Design
PennDesign Women in Architecture


[RE]Action is a full day of workshops empowering the future leaders in design. Organized by PennDesign Women in Architecture, the event presents opportunities for attendees to acquire a toolset to take charge of their careers and set themselves up for success. Workshop topics will include Negotiation, Networking, Knowing Your Rights, Navigating Construction Sites, and Assertive Communication. PWIA is committed to equity in design and welcomes all to join us.

Calendar
10:00-10:15 Group Introduction 10:15 - 11:00 Keynote
11:00-1:00 Navigating Architecture + Entrepreneurship Panel A
2:00-2:45 Workshop 1
3:00-3:45 Workshop 2
4:00-4:45 Workshop 3
5:00-5:30 Closing Statements

Student Leaders: Aahana Miller, Ramona Adlakha, Ramune Bartuskaite
Faculty Mentor: Franca Trubiano

Add to Calendar 03/20/2018 10:00 AM 03/20/2018 5:30 PM America/New_York [RE]ACTION: Empowering the Future Leaders in Design
[RE]Action is a full day of workshops empowering the future leaders in design. Organized by PennDesign Women in Architecture, the event presents opportunities for attendees to acquire a toolset to take charge of their careers and set themselves up for success. Workshop topics will include Negotiation, Networking, Knowing Your Rights, Navigating Construction Sites, and Assertive Communication. PWIA is committed to equity in design and welcomes all to join us.

Calendar

10:00-10:15 Group Introduction10:15 - 11:00 Keynote
11:00-1:00 Navigating Architecture + Entrepreneurship Panel A
2:00-2:45 Workshop 1
3:00-3:45 Workshop 2
4:00-4:45 Workshop 3
5:00-5:30 Closing Statements

Student Leaders : Aahana Miller, Ramona Adlakha, Ramune Bartuskaite
Faculty Mentor: Franca Trubiano
Meyerson Hall and Morgan Building
Panelist
Monument Lab
Civic Studio on Public Space (An Exhibition)

Throughout the Teach-In, Monument Lab collaborators will present research projects from Penn students in the Civic Studio course, including final projects that offers guidance on the creative and civic impulses of monument making; a first glimpse at the public proposals and data sets collected by students at the labs across the city; a takeaway self-guided tour of the Schuylkill River-as-Monument;  and a special virtual reality tour of the exhibition's prototype monuments produced by Penn Libraries' PennImmersive.

What is an appropriate monument for the current city of Philadelphia? To reflect on this line of inquiry, Monument Lab – a research team led by Ken Lum (Professor and Chair, Fine Arts Department at PennDesign) and Paul Farber (Managing Director, Penn Program in Environmental Humanities), with collaborators in the School of Arts and Sciences, PennDesign, Penn Libraries, Penn Institute for Urban Research, Price Lab for Digital Humanities, and dozens of other municipal partners across the city – staged a two-month citywide public art and history exhibition with Mural Arts Philadelphia last Fall. Over 200,000 people engaged with the exhibition across the city, which featured prototype monuments at City Hall, iconic public squares, and neighborhood parks, as imagined by leading public artists focused on themes of social justice and solidarity. Additionally, Monument Lab opened adjacent learning labs at these sites which were operated by teams consisting of local educators, high school fellows, and Penn students enrolled in a Netter Center-supported class "Civic Studio course." Through their efforts, close to 5,000 speculative public monument proposals were gathered from participants. As an outcome to this exhibition, the research team will produce a forthcoming Report to the City, share an open data set of all of the proposals on OpenDataPhilly, and extend learnings with continued collaborative installations and projects in cities aimed at unearthing the next generation of monuments.

Philadelphia is a city full of monuments and memorials. Philadelphia is also a city full of monumental histories, many of which are little known, obscured, or simply unacknowledged. These underrepresented histories often exist in tension with officially acknowledged narratives. As a society, through this moment of intensity and uncertainty around public monuments—especially those that symbolize the enduring legacies of racial injustice and social inequality—we are reminded that we must find new, critical ways to reflect on the monuments we have inherited and imagine future monuments we have yet to build.

Partners:
Penn Fine Arts
PennDesign
Penn Program in Environmental Humanities
Penn Libraries
Netter Center
Penn Institute for Urban Research
Price Lab for Digital Humanities

Add to Calendar 03/20/2018 10:00 AM 03/20/2018 5:00 PM America/New_York Monument Lab-Civic Studio on Public Space (An Exhibition)

Throughout the Teach-In, Monument Lab collaborators will present research projects from Penn students in the Civic Studio course, including final projects that offers guidance on the creative and civic impulses of monument making; a first glimpse at the public proposals and data sets collected by students at the labs across the city; a takeaway self-guided tour of the Schuylkill River-as-Monument;  and a special virtual reality tour of the exhibition's prototype monuments produced by Penn Libraries' PennImmersive.

What is an appropriate monument for the current city of Philadelphia? To reflect on this line of inquiry, Monument Lab – a research team led by Ken Lum (Professor and Chair, Fine Arts Department at PennDesign) and Paul Farber (Managing Director, Penn Program in Environmental Humanities), with collaborators in the School of Arts and Sciences, PennDesign, Penn Libraries, Penn Institute for Urban Research, Price Lab for Digital Humanities, and dozens of other municipal partners across the city – staged a two-month citywide public art and history exhibition with Mural Arts Philadelphia last Fall. Over 200,000 people engaged with the exhibition across the city, which featured prototype monuments at City Hall, iconic public squares, and neighborhood parks, as imagined by leading public artists focused on themes of social justice and solidarity. Additionally, Monument Lab opened adjacent learning labs at these sites which were operated by teams consisting of local educators, high school fellows, and Penn students enrolled in a Netter Center-supported class "Civic Studio course." Through their efforts, close to 5,000 speculative public monument proposals were gathered from participants. As an outcome to this exhibition, the research team will produce a forthcoming Report to the City, share an open data set of all of the proposals on OpenDataPhilly, and extend learnings with continued collaborative installations and projects in cities aimed at unearthing the next generation of monuments.

Philadelphia is a city full of monuments and memorials. Philadelphia is also a city full of monumental histories, many of which are little known, obscured, or simply unacknowledged. These underrepresented histories often exist in tension with officially acknowledged narratives. As a society, through this moment of intensity and uncertainty around public monuments—especially those that symbolize the enduring legacies of racial injustice and social inequality—we are reminded that we must find new, critical ways to reflect on the monuments we have inherited and imagine future monuments we have yet to build.

Partners:
Penn Fine Arts
PennDesign
Penn Program in Environmental Humanities
Penn Libraries
Netter Center
Penn Institute for Urban Research
Price Lab for Digital Humanities

Addams Hall
Learn More

Panelist

Panelist

Panelist

The Future of Technology: Engineering Human Health

Panelists: Jenn Cremins, Dave Meaney, and David Issadore
Moderator: Kathleen Stebe

Novel technologies for imaging, gene editing and diagnostics are driving new developments in medicine and transforming health care. Imaging techniques and data science will improve our understanding and treatment of concussion. Tools like CRISPR/Cas9 will allow us to precisely manipulate genes to treat diseases in humans and improve our immune systems. Point-of-care testing will allows diagnoses in the field, lowering the barrier to healthcare by providing affording and timely interventions. This panel will address the broader implications of new advances in health care and the societal and ethical implications.

Add to Calendar 03/20/2018 10:30 AM 03/20/2018 11:15 AM America/New_York The Future of Technology: Engineering Human Health Novel technologies for imaging, gene editing and diagnostics are driving new developments in medicine and transforming health care. Imaging techniques and data science will improve our understanding and treatment of concussion. Tools like CRISPR/Cas9 will allow us to precisely manipulate genes to treat diseases in humans and improve our immune systems. Point-of-care testing will allows diagnoses in the field, lowering the barrier to healthcare by providing affording and timely interventions. This panel will address the broader implications of new advances in health care and the societal and ethical implications. Glandt Forum (Singh Nanotechnology Center, 3205 Walnut)
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The Future of Technology: Artificial Intelligence and Society
Stories from the Warren Center

Panel: Drs. Michael Kearns, Rakesh Vohra, and Aaron Roth
Moderator: Dr. Susan Davidson

More and more of our lives are shaped by algorithms behind the scenes. Algorithmic decision making now contributes to the prices of goods and services we purchase, the media we consume, the advertisements we see, whether we are approved for a loan or interviewed for a job, and whether we are released on parole or on bail. The list goes on and is only getting longer. Consequential decisions --- ones that required balancing questions of fairness, privacy and efficiency -- that were once made by humans are now increasingly made by algorithms. How should these concerns to be 'designed' into algorithms? Can they be? Should they be?

Add to Calendar 03/20/2018 11:30 AM 03/20/2018 12:15 PM America/New_York The Future of Technology: AI and Society More and more of our lives are shaped by algorithms behind the scenes. Algorithmic decision making now contributes to the prices of goods and services we purchase, the media we consume, the advertisements we see, whether we are approved for a loan or interviewed for a job, and whether we are released on parole or on bail. The list goes on and is only getting longer. Consequential decisions --- ones that required balancing questions of fairness, privacy and efficiency -- that were once made by humans are now increasingly made by algorithms. How should these concerns to be 'designed' into algorithms? Can they be? Should they be? Glandt Forum (Singh Nanotechnology Center, 3205 Walnut)
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The Future of the Past
Lessons from History

We live in a time when we are captivated by our own knowledge. 'We have seen revolutions based on technological advances that seem to us to have utterly changed our lives, so much so that prior times, decades or centuries ago, may appear quaint and distant. 'While we are probably right be impressed with ourselves, it is probably also right to point our that our own age is not unique in being a witness to a rapid increase in knowledge and understanding. 'In this panel we will go back not decades or centuries, but millennia, to survey the creation, dissemination, and use of knowledge in antiquity. This other time of rapid expansion in the deep past, in technologies of building and manufacture, trade and intercultural links, and expression of human experience in literature and philosophy, will provide new perspectives on how we treat knowledge in the present day, and perhaps also some reminders that not all parts of our contemporary experience are'sui generis, but some belong to the deep and rich history of humans on this planet hundreds of lifetimes ago.

  • Brian Rose, "Are We Rome?: Ancient and Contemporary Approaches to the Commemoration of War and Triumph"
  • Peter Struck, 'Ancient Thinking about Thinking: 'What We Can Learn from Greek Philosophers about Intuition."
  • Jermey McInerney, 'Red State, Blue State. Athenian State, United State(s): Comparing Democracies, Ancient and Modern'
  • Sheila Murnaghan, 'Ancient Myths and Modern Lives: Reading Homer with Veterans"

Brian Rose
James B. Pritchard Professor of Mediterranean Archaeology at 'Penn'
Peter C. Ferry Curator-in-Charge of the Mediterranean Section at'the Penn Museum
Past President, Archaeological Institute of America
President, American Research Institute in Turkey
Brian'Rose focuses on the archaeology of both Italy and Anatolia between the Iron Age'and Roman Imperial periods.'Between 1988 and 2012 he directed Post-Bronze Age'(Greek, Roman, Byzantine) excavations at Troy, and serves as'English language'editor of'Studia Troica, the annual journal of the Troy'excavations. His synthesis of the excavations at'Troy (The Archaeology of'Greek and Roman Troy) was published by Cambridge in 2014, and the'publications of Troy's'West Sanctuary and Roman houses is forthcoming. He surveyed'the Granicus River Valley in northwestern Turkey for four'years, with a focus'on recording and mapping the Graeco-Persian tombs that dominate the area. He'now serves as director'of Penn's excavations at Gordion, and has recently'edited three monographs:'The New Chronology of Iron Age Gordion,'The'Archaeology of Phrygian Gordion,'and'The Golden Age of King Midas.'His'research has also concentrated on the political and artistic relationship'between Rome and the provinces, which he'presented in'Dynastic Commemoration'and Imperial Portraiture in the Julio-Claudian Period'(Cambridge,'1997). As'curator-in-charge of the Penn Museum's Mediterranean Section, he'recently curated an exhibit on MIdas and Phrygia that'highlighted Penn's'discoveries at Gordion since 1950. He is Vice Chair of the Board of Trustees of'the American Academy'in Rome and a member of the Board of Directors of the'Council of American Overseas Research Centers. In 2015 he'received the AIA's'Gold Medal for Distinguished Archaeological Achievement.

Peter Struck
Professor and Chair, Classical Studies
Director, Benjamin Franklin Scholars
Peter T. Struck is Professor and chair of the Department of Classical Studies at the University of Pennsylvania. He is director of the Benjamin Franklin Scholars program and founder of'its Integrated Studies curriculum. He is cofounder (with Sarah Igo) of the National Forum on the Future of Liberal Education,'and has worked with foundations, news organizations, and scholarly societies to promote the liberal arts. He has won'multiple teaching awards at Penn for innovation, including the Lindback Award, the university's top teaching prize. He has'published extensively on the intellectual history of Greek and Roman antiquity. His book'Birth of the Symbol: Ancient'Readers at the Limits of Their Texts'(Princeton 2004) won the Goodwin Award from the American Philological Association for'best book in classical studies. He edited'Mantik'(with Sarah Iles Johnston; Brill 2006) and the'Cambridge Companion to'Allegory'(with Rita Copeland; Cambridge 2010). His most recent book is'Divination and Human Nature: A Cognitive History'of Intuition in Antiquity,'(Princeton 2016), for which he also won the Goodwin Award for best book in classical studies. He is general editor (with Sophia Rosenfeld) of the six-volume'Cultural History of'Ideas'forthcoming from Bloomsbury Academic in 2018. He has published widely in on ancient philosophy, religion, magic'and divination, and literary criticism, and has given dozens of lectures at universities in the United States and Europe. He'has held fellowships from the National Humanities Center, the American Council of Learned Societies, the Whiting'Foundation, the Mellon Foundation, the Center for Advanced Studies in Behavioral Sciences at Stanford, and the American'Academy in Rome.

Jermey McInerney
Professor of'Classical Studies
Chair of the Graduate'Group in'Ancient History'
Jeremy McInerney'completed his PhD in 1992 at the University of'California, Berkeley. He is the author of'The'Folds of Parnassos, a book on state formation in Archaic Greece and'The'Cattle of the Sun,'a book dealing'with the importance of cattle-raising, meat and sacrifice in the culture of'Ancient Greece. He is editor of Blackwell's'Companion'to Ethnicity in the Ancient Mediterranean'and'co-editor of'Landscapes of Value:'Natural Environment and Cultural Imagination in Classical'Antiquity,'published in 2016. In January 2018'Thames and Hudson published his new volume,'Ancient'Greece: A New History. He has published more'than thirty articles on topics'ranging from gender to epigraphy. Currently he is working on the function of'hybridity in Greek culture, and is also completing'a study of Athenians'relations with the island of Lemnos as part of which he reexamines the temple'of Hephaistos at Athens. He serves on the Managing'Committee of the American'School of Classical Studies at Athens, where he was Whitehead Professor in'2013-14. At the University of Pennsylvania he'has won the Ira Abrams teaching'award from the School of Arts and Sciences and the Lindback award from the'university.

Sheila Murnaghan
Allen Memorial Professor of Greek
Sheila Murnaghan works on ancient Greek poetry, especially epic and tragedy, gender in classical'culture, and the modern reception of classical literature. 'Her latest publications include a co-authored book,'Childhood and the Classics: Britain and'America 1850-1965, a new translation of Euripides''Medea, and a coedited volume on classics and writers of the Beat generation.'

Add to Calendar 03/20/2018 12:30 PM 03/20/2018 2:00 PM America/New_York The Future of the Past We live in a time when we are captivated by our own knowledge. 'We have seen revolutions based on technological advances that seem to us to have utterly changed our lives, so much so that prior times, decades or centuries ago, may appear quaint and distant. 'While we are probably right be impressed with ourselves, it is probably also right to point our that our own age is not unique in being a witness to a rapid increase in knowledge and understanding. 'In this panel we will go back not decades or centuries, but millennia, to survey the creation, dissemination, and use of knowledge in antiquity. This other time of rapid expansion in the deep past, in technologies of building and manufacture, trade and intercultural links, and expression of human experience in literature and philosophy, will provide new perspectives on how we treat knowledge in the present day, and perhaps also some reminders that not all parts of our contemporary experience are'sui generis, but some belong to the deep and rich history of humans on this planet hundreds of lifetimes ago. Van Pelt Library: Class of '55

A Walk through Time
Special Artistic Exhibit: The Evolution "Donut" Crawl

As part of the Teach-In, the biology department is collaborating with the School of Design to create a walk through evolutionary time on Locust walk. The idea of the walk is to highlight the timeline of the evolution of life (from RNA to single cell organisms to humans) as well as many of the fundamental principles that underlie evolution. We propose to highlight these principles through a series of narratives that are artistically appealing. One of the underlying goals of this project is to disseminate science through art.

The walk will start on Woodland walk slightly east of Van Pelt Library with the formation of earth (~4.5 billions years ago, BYA) as the first time point. Right in front of Van Pelt we will introduce the concept of the “primordial soup” with the first appearance of RNA (~4 BYA) followed the appearance of DNA/Protein and the first cells (~3.5 – 3.8 BYA). We will then illustrate the first stages of life expansion with several “time warps through time” using chalk art on the walk. One of these will end up with the appearance of eukaryotic cells (~2.1 BYA). Going in another direction we propose a time warp for prokaryotic life (bacteria and archea) evolution. [are viruses considered life? It would be cool to represent where they branched off] Where these early branches of the tree of life occur, we propose to have an exhibit to illustrate the concept of the phylogenetic tree.

At the end of the time warp to eukaryotic cells (~2.1 BYA), the walk will progress in a quasi linear fashion all the way to Huntsman Hall where we will have exhibits on human migration and the future of human/machine interface. Major time points in (vertebrate) evolution will be illustrated along the walk. Examples of these time points include: spit between plants, fungi and animals (~1.5 BYA), appearance of first multicellular organisms (~900 MYA), appearance of first vertebrates (~500 MYA), tetrapods split from fish (~400 MYA), appearance of first mammals (~308 BYA), monotremes split off (~160 MYA), rodents split off (~125 MYA), apes split from monkeys (~15 MYA), humans split from chimps (~4 MYA), Homo sapiens appear (~2.5 MYA).

In addition to the timeline, the walk between Van Pelt Library and Huntsman Hall will contain a number of exhibits that ideally would include a variety of art media such as chalk art, sculpture, window art, A/V and information booths.

Add to Calendar 03/20/2018 1:00 PM 03/20/2018 5:30 PM America/New_York A Walk through Time As part of the Teach-In, the biology department is collaborating with the School of Design to create a walk through evolutionary time on Locust walk. The idea of the walk is to highlight the timeline of the evolution of life (from RNA to single cell organisms to humans) as well as many of the fundamental principles that underlie evolution. We propose to highlight these principles through a series of narratives that are artistically appealing. One of the underlying goals of this project is to disseminate science through art. Locust Walk

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AI: Augmented Reality Scavenger Hunt
A Public Event

An augmented reality game aimed at introducing general public (e.g. students, staff, and visitors) to the wonders of artificial intelligence using a augmented reality technology. Cool prizes will be awarded!

Jonathan Lee is a graduate student in the Computer Graphics and Game Technology program and will be completing his masters in May. Before coming to Penn, Jonathan received his BS in Computer Science from Rutgers University. One of the areas Jonathan is strongly interested in is developing unique virtual and augmented reality experiences.

Dr. Stephen H. Lane is an accomplished researcher, educator and entrepreneur with over 25 years of experience designing, developing and commercializing advanced 3D graphics and animation technology for use in computer games, virtual reality, and distributed simulation and training applications. Dr. Lane’s responsibilities have ranged from basic technology development to computer hardware and software design, project management and business development. He is currently an Professor of Practice in the Computer & Info Science Dept. and also President of soVoz, Inc., a company developing advanced virtual reality user interfaces for immersive training and gaming applications.

Add to Calendar 03/20/2018 6:00 PM 03/20/2018 8:00 PM America/New_York AI: Augmented Reality Scavenger Hunt A augmented reality game aimed at introducing general public (e.g. students, staff, and visitors) to the wonders of artificial intelligence using a augmented reality technology. Cool prizes will be awarded! Levine Hall in Engineering Complex
Bride of Frankenstein
The Bride of Frankenstein
Bioethics Film Festival

The Department of Medical Ethics and Health Policy of the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine will host its third annual Bioethics Film Festival, Frankenstein, March 20-22.

The screening of "The Bride of Frankenstein" (1935 | 75 m) will begin at 6 pm, and will be preceded by a reception. In addition to the screening there will be a panel discussion of the film with Penn faculty and special guest Professor Susan Lederer, a distinguished University of Wisconsin historian and authority on the novel, Frankenstein, and its influence. Her book, Frankenstein: Penetrating the Secrets of Nature, accompanied a National Library of Medicine exhibit in 2002.

This year's other films are "Young Frankenstein" (1974) on March 21, and "Blade Runner" – Final Cut (1982, re-released 2007) on March 22.

5:30pm – Reception
6:00pm – The Bride of Frankenstein (1935)

Moderator: Lance Wahlert (University of Pennsylvania)
Discussant: Susan Lederer (University of Wisconsin)

Add to Calendar 03/20/2018 5:30 PM 03/20/2018 7:45 PM America/New_York The Bride of Frankenstein Bioethics Film Festival: The screening of "The Bride of Frankenstein" (1935 | 75 m) will begin at 6 pm, and will be preceded by a reception. In addition to the screening there will be a panel discussion of the film with Penn faculty and special guest Professor Susan Lederer, a distinguished University of Wisconsin historian and authority on the novel, Frankenstein, and its influence. Her book, Frankenstein: Penetrating the Secrets of Nature, accompanied a National Library of Medicine exhibit in 2002. International House, Ibrahim Theater, 3701 Chestnut St
Penn Museum
Monument Lab
Civic Studio on Public Space (An Exhibition)

Throughout the Teach-In, Monument Lab collaborators will present research projects from Penn students in the Civic Studio course, including final projects that offers guidance on the creative and civic impulses of monument making; a first glimpse at the public proposals and data sets collected by students at the labs across the city; a takeaway self-guided tour of the Schuylkill River-as-Monument;  and a special virtual reality tour of the exhibition's prototype monuments produced by Penn Libraries' PennImmersive.

What is an appropriate monument for the current city of Philadelphia? To reflect on this line of inquiry, Monument Lab – a research team led by Ken Lum (Professor and Chair, Fine Arts Department at PennDesign) and Paul Farber (Managing Director, Penn Program in Environmental Humanities), with collaborators in the School of Arts and Sciences, PennDesign, Penn Libraries, Penn Institute for Urban Research, Price Lab for Digital Humanities, and dozens of other municipal partners across the city – staged a two-month citywide public art and history exhibition with Mural Arts Philadelphia last Fall. Over 200,000 people engaged with the exhibition across the city, which featured prototype monuments at City Hall, iconic public squares, and neighborhood parks, as imagined by leading public artists focused on themes of social justice and solidarity. Additionally, Monument Lab opened adjacent learning labs at these sites which were operated by teams consisting of local educators, high school fellows, and Penn students enrolled in a Netter Center-supported class "Civic Studio course." Through their efforts, close to 5,000 speculative public monument proposals were gathered from participants. As an outcome to this exhibition, the research team will produce a forthcoming Report to the City, share an open data set of all of the proposals on OpenDataPhilly, and extend learnings with continued collaborative installations and projects in cities aimed at unearthing the next generation of monuments.

Philadelphia is a city full of monuments and memorials. Philadelphia is also a city full of monumental histories, many of which are little known, obscured, or simply unacknowledged. These underrepresented histories often exist in tension with officially acknowledged narratives. As a society, through this moment of intensity and uncertainty around public monuments—especially those that symbolize the enduring legacies of racial injustice and social inequality—we are reminded that we must find new, critical ways to reflect on the monuments we have inherited and imagine future monuments we have yet to build.

Partners:
Penn Fine Arts
PennDesign
Penn Program in Environmental Humanities
Penn Libraries
Netter Center
Penn Institute for Urban Research
Price Lab for Digital Humanities

Add to Calendar 03/21/2018 10:00 AM 03/21/2018 5:00 PM America/New_York Monument Lab-Civic Studio on Public Space (An Exhibition)

Throughout the Teach-In, Monument Lab collaborators will present research projects from Penn students in the Civic Studio course, including final projects that offers guidance on the creative and civic impulses of monument making; a first glimpse at the public proposals and data sets collected by students at the labs across the city; a takeaway self-guided tour of the Schuylkill River-as-Monument;  and a special virtual reality tour of the exhibition's prototype monuments produced by Penn Libraries' PennImmersive.

What is an appropriate monument for the current city of Philadelphia? To reflect on this line of inquiry, Monument Lab – a research team led by Ken Lum (Professor and Chair, Fine Arts Department at PennDesign) and Paul Farber (Managing Director, Penn Program in Environmental Humanities), with collaborators in the School of Arts and Sciences, PennDesign, Penn Libraries, Penn Institute for Urban Research, Price Lab for Digital Humanities, and dozens of other municipal partners across the city – staged a two-month citywide public art and history exhibition with Mural Arts Philadelphia last Fall. Over 200,000 people engaged with the exhibition across the city, which featured prototype monuments at City Hall, iconic public squares, and neighborhood parks, as imagined by leading public artists focused on themes of social justice and solidarity. Additionally, Monument Lab opened adjacent learning labs at these sites which were operated by teams consisting of local educators, high school fellows, and Penn students enrolled in a Netter Center-supported class "Civic Studio course." Through their efforts, close to 5,000 speculative public monument proposals were gathered from participants. As an outcome to this exhibition, the research team will produce a forthcoming Report to the City, share an open data set of all of the proposals on OpenDataPhilly, and extend learnings with continued collaborative installations and projects in cities aimed at unearthing the next generation of monuments.

Philadelphia is a city full of monuments and memorials. Philadelphia is also a city full of monumental histories, many of which are little known, obscured, or simply unacknowledged. These underrepresented histories often exist in tension with officially acknowledged narratives. As a society, through this moment of intensity and uncertainty around public monuments—especially those that symbolize the enduring legacies of racial injustice and social inequality—we are reminded that we must find new, critical ways to reflect on the monuments we have inherited and imagine future monuments we have yet to build.

Partners:
Penn Fine Arts
PennDesign
Penn Program in Environmental Humanities
Penn Libraries
Netter Center
Penn Institute for Urban Research
Price Lab for Digital Humanities

Addams Hall
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Data Refuge Stories
An Public Engagement Project of the Penn Program in Environmental Humanities and Penn Librarires

Please visit a story collector in one of several campus locations:
Van Pelt Library
Medical School
Meyerson Hall
McNeil Building
Vet School
David Rittenhouse Labs

For the Teach-In, Data Refuge Stories teams will conduct mapping and storytelling actions, across campus staged at central locations of interdisciplinary knowledge production and circulation. At each Data Refuge Stories site, teams comprised of PPEH graduate/undergraduate fellows, will gather stories about data, research, and evidence-based practice, all of which will be entered into the Data Refuge storybank. The teams will be situated at tables placed within central locations across campus where faculty, staff, and students produce and/or consume varieties of data, including the Van Pelt Library, Medical School, Meyerson Hall, McNeil Building, and David Rittenhouse Labs. The end goal is to map Data Refuge Stories across this campus and beyond, to offer insight into the ways research lives through stories, sites, and engaged practices of scholars, and to better advocate for evidence-based inquiry and open data.
Data Refuge launched November 2016 in Philadelphia to draw attention to how climate denial endangers federal environmental data. Spearheaded by the Penn Program in Environmental Humanities (PPEH) and Penn Libraries, along with the help of thousands of civic partners and volunteers, the project rapidly spread to over fifty cities and towns across the country. Now, as a part of a public engagement project funded by the National Geographic Foundation, Data Refuge is building a storybank to document how data lives in the world ' and how it connects people, places, and non-human species.

Add to Calendar 03/21/2018 12:00 PM 03/21/2018 3:00 PM America/New_York Data Refuge Stories Van Pelt Library, Medical School, Meyerson Hall, McNeil Building, Vet School and David Rittenhouse Labs Multiple Locations

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Developing a Culture of Health
Hosted by the Penn Professional Staff Assembly and the Weekly-Paid Penn Professional Staff Assembly

'Developing a Culture of Health on a University Campus' will promote the Teach-In mission of 'knowledge use, dissemination, development' by providing evidence-based approaches to health and wellness. Participants will leave encouraged that self-care and wellness are important (as demonstrated by research) and will also leave with some tips about ways to embrace a culture of health.
The panel will include one student, one faculty member, and one staff member from the Penn community: Jasmine Blanks Jones, PhD student, Education and African Studies, and a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Health Policy Research Scholar; Terri Lipman, PhD, CRNP, FAAN, Miriam Stirl Endowed Term Professor of Nutrition, Professor of Nursing of Children, Assistant Dean for Community Engagement, Interim Program Director, and Pediatric Acute Care Nurse Practitioner Program in the School of Nursing; Chris Hyson, Sr. Health and Wellness Specialist from the Division of Human Resources.

Add to Calendar 03/21/2018 1:00 PM 03/21/2018 2:30 PM America/New_York Developing a Culture of Health 'Developing a Culture of Health on a University Campus' will promote the Teach-In mission of 'knowledge use, dissemination, development' by providing evidence-based approaches to health and wellness. Participants will leave encouraged that self-care and wellness are important (as demonstrated by research) and will also leave with some tips about ways to embrace a culture of health. Van Pelt Library, 6th Floor


Penn staff members who register and attend are eligible to receive 10 Be In the Know Bonus Action Points.
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Thinking about Evolution: Science, History, Meaning
A Faculty Panel

Evolution is a powerful scientific explanation crucial to all of modern biology. It has been validated repeatedly, in studies of development, populations, mutation, genetics and genomics, over the last two centuries. Yet many people still question its legitimacy.

Forty-six percent of US citizens accept creationism: In a recent Gallup poll, they agreed that humans were created in their present form within the last 10,000 years. Of the 47% of respondents who said they believed that human beings were produced by evolution rather than special creation, more than two-thirds thought that a divine power had guided this process.

These responses stand in sharp contrast to those of biologists, who consider evolution to be as well established as the germ theory of disease, and who recognize human evolution as the result of natural processes consistent with evolution in other organisms.

This panel discussion will focus on the development of evolutionary theory, the current state of evolution (including the issues that are actually controversial), and the big, historical and philosophical themes about nature and ourselves that evolution has taught us. Panelists will highlight research at Penn that addresses the discrepancy between public and professional acceptance of evolution. We will invite our audience to join us in a discussion about how we can better communicate these important ideas to the public.

Why has evolution been almost a lightning rod for public concerns about science for so long? What are the newest insights of the science of evolution today? How has public understanding of evolution changed over time? Our panel brings together a distinguished group of faculty from biology, philosophy and history to critically explore one of the most important ideas in all of science.

Chair: Sarah Tishkoff
Professor Tishkoff is the David and Lyn Silfen University Professor in Genetics and Biology at the University of Pennsylvania, holding appointments in the School of Medicine and the School of Arts and Sciences. She studies enomic and phenotypic variation in ethnically diverse Africans. Her research combines field work, laboratory research, and computational methods to examine African population history and how genetic variation can affect a wide range of practical issues ' for example, why humans have different susceptibility to disease, how they metabolize drugs, and how they adapt through evolution.

Panel:
Susan Lindee: Darwin's World
Janice and Julian Bers Professor of the History and Sociology of Science
Chair, History and Sociology of Science
Professor Lindee's research focuses on the history of genetics in the twentieth century. Much of her work explores how Cold War radiation risk created new resources and research opportunities for geneticists in the United States, and how it animated new interest in isolated groups around the world. She is also an ongoing lecturer on Darwin for One Day University and recently served as ship's historian for a tour of the Galapagos Islands.

Paul Schmidt: Understanding Natural Selection
Professor of Biology
Associate Chair of Department
Professor Schmidt's research group explores the evolution of complex traits and the mechanisms of rapid evolution in natural populations. As part of his sabbatical research this year, Schmidt is studying speciation and adaptation to high altitudes in African populations of flies and mosquitoes. He will be just back from his field research in Africa when he joins us to explore broader questions of evolution.

Paul Sniegowski: Mutation and Its Meanings
Professor of Biology
Stephen A. Levin Family Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences
Professor Sniegowski uses experimental populations of microbes to study evolutionary processes in real time. His work draws on evolutionary and population genetic theory as a framework for understanding the evolutionary significance of mutation rates and mutational phenomena. Mutation is the ultimate source of the genetic variation that fuels evolution and yet is also the cause of genetic diseases and cancers. Sniegowski is dean of Penn's College of Arts and Sciences and therefore very engaged with undergraduate education. He is known for his adventurous daily bicycle commute to Penn from Media, PA.

Michael Weisberg: Why the Galapagos Islands Matter
Professor of Philosophy
Chair Department of Philosophy
Professor Weisberg's research focuses on the philosophy of science, especially the role of idealization in modeling. His other research includes social and cultural evolutionary theory, the nature of the chemical bond, the division of cognitive labor, and the public understanding of evolution and climate change. He regularly discusses his findings with academic audiences, policy makers, and the public, having given presentations at the Penn Lightbulb Caf', the AAAS, the National Academy of Sciences, and to park officials, naturalist guides, and tourists in the Gal'pagos. He is Co-Director of the Galapagos Alliance, which works with communities in the Galapagos to increase public understanding of the importance of this research site.

Add to Calendar 03/21/2018 3:00 PM 03/21/2018 4:30 PM America/New_York Thinking about Evolution: Science, History, Meaning This panel discussion will focus on the development of evolutionary theory, the current state of evolution (including the issues that are actually controversial), and the big, historical and philosophical themes about nature and ourselves that evolution has taught us. Panelists will highlight research at Penn that addresses the discrepancy between public and professional acceptance of evolution. We will invite our audience to join us in a discussion about how we can better communicate these important ideas to the public. Van Pelt Library, Class of '55

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2018 Evan C Thompson Chair Lecture: Improving Decision Making
Targeting Teaching and Learning

The more we understand about how students study and learn, the better we can teach and help them thrive. Extensive research in behavioral economics has found that students’ choices about when, whether and how to study are heavily dependent on context. Simply the way in which a choice is presented – choice architecture – can be a very valuable tool for improving student outcomes and choices.

In her Evan C Thompson Chair Lecture on Excellence in Teaching, Professor Katy Milkman of Management will show how faculty and others teaching can leverage insights about what influences choices in order to guide the behavior of students in productive ways. By presenting on the basics of wise choice architecture and on nudges that have been proved to increase good decisions, she will provide actionable takeaways to enhance student learning.

Add to Calendar 03/21/2018 3:00 PM 03/21/2018 4:30 PM America/New_York 2018 Evan C Thompson Chair Lecture: Improving Decision Making The more we understand about how students study and learn, the better we can teach and help them thrive. Extensive research in behavioral economics has found that students’ choices about when, whether and how to study are heavily dependent on context. Simply the way in which a choice is presented – choice architecture – can be a very valuable tool for improving student outcomes and choices. In her Evan C Thompson Chair Lecture on Excellence in Teaching, Professor Katy Milkman of Management will show how faculty and others teaching can leverage insights about what influences choices in order to guide the behavior of students in productive ways. By presenting on the basics of wise choice architecture and on nudges that have been proved to increase good decisions, she will provide actionable takeaways to enhance student learning. Van Pelt Library, Class of 1978 Orrery Pavillion, 6th Floor
Immigration Panel & Town Hall
More Info Soon

Content TBD

Add to Calendar 03/21/2018 5:00 PM 03/21/2018 7:30 PM America/New_York Immigration Panel & Town Hall Content TBD Law School

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Post-Carbon Futures in a Fact-Challenged Present Futures

Domestic American politics have long played a role in climate negotiations, including in the current federal administration's announced plan to withdraw from the 2015 Paris Climate Agreement. In contrast to the guarded optimism of climate change activists after COP21 in Paris, the emotional climate after the recent COP23 in Bonn was notably gloomy.

Nonetheless, state and city leaders insist #WeAreStillIn, organized across a coalition of 2,500 leaders from city halls, state houses, boardrooms, and college campuses who have signed the 'We Are Still In' declaration to organize across local contexts and bring about a systematic response to urgent environmental issues.

As we study and engage the present and future of the carbon economy, this roundtable brings together experts on energy transitions past and present as well as energy and health policy at the state and local level.

Panel
Brian Black ' Distinguished Professor, History and Environmental Studies, Penn State Altoona
Amy Jewel ' City Energy Project City Advisor, City of Chicago
Poun' Saberi ' Physicians for Social Responsibility
John Quigley ' Founding Director Center for Environment, Energy & Economy, Harrisburg University

Add to Calendar 03/21/2018 5:00 PM 03/21/2018 6:30 PM America/New_York Post-Carbon Futures in a Fact-Challenged Present As we study and engage the present and future of the carbon economy, this roundtable brings together experts on energy transitions past and present as well as energy and health policy at the state and local level. Van Pelt Library, Class of '78
Young Frankenstein
Young Frankenstein
Bioethics Film Festival

The Department of Medical Ethics and Health Policy of the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine will host its third annual Bioethics Film Festival, Frankenstein, March 20-22.

The screening of "Young Frankenstein" (1974 | 1h 46m) will begin at 6 pm, and will be preceded by a reception. In addition to the screening there will be a panel discussion of the film with Penn faculty and guests.

This year's other films are "The Bride of Frankenstein" (1935) on March 20, and "Blade Runner" – Final Cut (1982, re-released 2007) on March 22.

5:30pm – Reception
6:00pm – Young Frankenstein (1974)

Moderator:
Jonathan D. Moreno (Penn Department of Medical Ethics & Health Policy, Penn PIK)

Panel:
Peter Decherney (Penn Cinema Studies)
Marcia Ferguson (Penn Cinema Studies)
Adrian Raine (Penn Department of Criminology, Penn PIK)

Add to Calendar 03/21/2018 5:30 PM 03/21/2018 8:30 PM America/New_York The Bride of Frankenstein Bioethics Film Festival:The screening of "Young Frankenstein" (1974 | 1h 46m) will begin at 6 pm, and will be preceded by a reception. In addition to the screening there will be a panel discussion of the film with Penn faculty and guests. International House, Ibrahim Theater, 3701 Chestnut St
Monument Lab
Civic Studio on Public Space (An Exhibition)

Throughout the Teach-In, Monument Lab collaborators will present research projects from Penn students in the Civic Studio course, including final projects that offers guidance on the creative and civic impulses of monument making; a first glimpse at the public proposals and data sets collected by students at the labs across the city; a takeaway self-guided tour of the Schuylkill River-as-Monument;  and a special virtual reality tour of the exhibition's prototype monuments produced by Penn Libraries' PennImmersive.

What is an appropriate monument for the current city of Philadelphia? To reflect on this line of inquiry, Monument Lab – a research team led by Ken Lum (Professor and Chair, Fine Arts Department at PennDesign) and Paul Farber (Managing Director, Penn Program in Environmental Humanities), with collaborators in the School of Arts and Sciences, PennDesign, Penn Libraries, Penn Institute for Urban Research, Price Lab for Digital Humanities, and dozens of other municipal partners across the city – staged a two-month citywide public art and history exhibition with Mural Arts Philadelphia last Fall. Over 200,000 people engaged with the exhibition across the city, which featured prototype monuments at City Hall, iconic public squares, and neighborhood parks, as imagined by leading public artists focused on themes of social justice and solidarity. Additionally, Monument Lab opened adjacent learning labs at these sites which were operated by teams consisting of local educators, high school fellows, and Penn students enrolled in a Netter Center-supported class "Civic Studio course." Through their efforts, close to 5,000 speculative public monument proposals were gathered from participants. As an outcome to this exhibition, the research team will produce a forthcoming Report to the City, share an open data set of all of the proposals on OpenDataPhilly, and extend learnings with continued collaborative installations and projects in cities aimed at unearthing the next generation of monuments.

Philadelphia is a city full of monuments and memorials. Philadelphia is also a city full of monumental histories, many of which are little known, obscured, or simply unacknowledged. These underrepresented histories often exist in tension with officially acknowledged narratives. As a society, through this moment of intensity and uncertainty around public monuments—especially those that symbolize the enduring legacies of racial injustice and social inequality—we are reminded that we must find new, critical ways to reflect on the monuments we have inherited and imagine future monuments we have yet to build.

Partners:
Penn Fine Arts
PennDesign
Penn Program in Environmental Humanities
Penn Libraries
Netter Center
Penn Institute for Urban Research
Price Lab for Digital Humanities

Add to Calendar 03/22/2018 10:00 AM 03/22/2018 5:00 PM America/New_York Monument Lab-Civic Studio on Public Space (An Exhibition)

Throughout the Teach-In, Monument Lab collaborators will present research projects from Penn students in the Civic Studio course, including final projects that offers guidance on the creative and civic impulses of monument making; a first glimpse at the public proposals and data sets collected by students at the labs across the city; a takeaway self-guided tour of the Schuylkill River-as-Monument;  and a special virtual reality tour of the exhibition's prototype monuments produced by Penn Libraries' PennImmersive.

What is an appropriate monument for the current city of Philadelphia? To reflect on this line of inquiry, Monument Lab – a research team led by Ken Lum (Professor and Chair, Fine Arts Department at PennDesign) and Paul Farber (Managing Director, Penn Program in Environmental Humanities), with collaborators in the School of Arts and Sciences, PennDesign, Penn Libraries, Penn Institute for Urban Research, Price Lab for Digital Humanities, and dozens of other municipal partners across the city – staged a two-month citywide public art and history exhibition with Mural Arts Philadelphia last Fall. Over 200,000 people engaged with the exhibition across the city, which featured prototype monuments at City Hall, iconic public squares, and neighborhood parks, as imagined by leading public artists focused on themes of social justice and solidarity. Additionally, Monument Lab opened adjacent learning labs at these sites which were operated by teams consisting of local educators, high school fellows, and Penn students enrolled in a Netter Center-supported class "Civic Studio course." Through their efforts, close to 5,000 speculative public monument proposals were gathered from participants. As an outcome to this exhibition, the research team will produce a forthcoming Report to the City, share an open data set of all of the proposals on OpenDataPhilly, and extend learnings with continued collaborative installations and projects in cities aimed at unearthing the next generation of monuments.

Philadelphia is a city full of monuments and memorials. Philadelphia is also a city full of monumental histories, many of which are little known, obscured, or simply unacknowledged. These underrepresented histories often exist in tension with officially acknowledged narratives. As a society, through this moment of intensity and uncertainty around public monuments—especially those that symbolize the enduring legacies of racial injustice and social inequality—we are reminded that we must find new, critical ways to reflect on the monuments we have inherited and imagine future monuments we have yet to build.

Partners:
Penn Fine Arts
PennDesign
Penn Program in Environmental Humanities
Penn Libraries
Netter Center
Penn Institute for Urban Research
Price Lab for Digital Humanities

Addams Hall

Panelist

Panelist

Left, Right, and Center
Can We Talk?

Knowledge and democracy are both premised on a full and free exchange of ideas. To create and update knowledge, scholars must be free to pursue theories and evidence wherever they lead. And to govern themselves, citizens must be free to debate the content and contours of their shared public lives.

Universities lie at the heart of this vision, because they produce both knowledge and citizens. Yet in recent years, our universities have also witnessed sharp challenges to the free-exchange ideal. Controversial visitors to campus have been shouted down; racial and sexual minorities have been threatened; and across the political spectrum, students and faculty complain that the range of acceptable opinion has been narrowed. How can our universities model democratic dialogue, teaching people to speak across their differences in a mutually respectful manner? Building upon a set of student political dialogues developed last year, Harris Sokoloff and Jonathan Zimmerman will bring together several speakers from the Penn community to debate one of the most contentious issues in contemporary American life: sexual harassment. The session will aim not simply to shed light on this complicated question, but also to see if we can establish civil conversations between people with very different answers to it.

Add to Calendar 03/22/2018 11:30 AM 03/22/2018 1:30 PM America/New_York Left, Right, and Center: Can We Talk? Knowledge and democracy are both premised on a full and free exchange of ideas. To create and update knowledge, scholars must be free to pursue theories and evidence wherever they lead. And to govern themselves, citizens must be free to debate the content and contours of their shared public lives. Universities lie at the heart of this vision, because they produce both knowledge and citizens. Yet in recent years, our universities have also witnessed sharp challenges to the free-exchange ideal. Controversial visitors to campus have been shouted down; racial and sexual minorities have been threatened; and across the political spectrum, students and faculty complain that the range of acceptable opinion has been narrowed. How can our universities model democratic dialogue, teaching people to speak across their differences in a mutually respectful manner? Building upon a set of student political dialogues developed last year, Harris Sokoloff and Jonathan Zimmerman will bring together several speakers from the Penn community to debate one of the most contentious issues in contemporary American life: sexual harassment. The session will aim not simply to shed light on this complicated question, but also to see if we can establish civil conversations between people with very different answers to it. Catalyst, GSE, 3440 Market St, 5th Floor
Purposes of a Penn Education
Student Perspectives

This session will be led by the Student Committee on Undergraduate Education (SCUE) and will provide students with the opportunity to discuss their ideas and perspectives with faculty members, undergraduate deans, Provost, Vice Provost and other students.

Add to Calendar 03/22/2018 3:00 PM 03/22/2018 4:30 PM America/New_York Purposes of a Penn Education: Student Perspectives This session will be led by the Student Committee on Undergraduate Education (SCUE) and will provide students with the opportunity to discuss their ideas and perspectives with faculty members, undergraduate deans, Provost, Vice Provost and other students. Location TBD

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American Creed
Documentary Screening and Discussion

The Philadelphia Writing Project (PhilWP) is located in the Reading/Writing/Literacy Program and the Language, Culture, and International Education Division in the Graduate School of Education. One of the premier sites of the National Writing Project, PhilWP has a 32-year history as a teacher network collaborating with over 800 teacher consultants who work in a variety of ways with teachers and other educators to explore literacy, writing, teaching, and learning in their classrooms and schools. Students and teachers are engaged in discussions about cutting-edge topics that enhance their exposure to critical issues in literary works and in the world. For the University of Pennsylvania Teach-In, PhilWP will air American Creed, a new PBS film, that explores values that underlie American identity and that encourages dialogue across difference. The filming will be followed by a workshop session, facilitated by Dr. Vivian Gadsden, and will include public school students from the Philly School Media Network (Henry C. Lea, George Washington Carver, U School, and Youth Build) and the Philadelphia Public School Notebook. Penn faculty, graduate students, K-12 teachers, and Philadelphia students will be invited to discuss issues raised in the film and co-construct knowledge and strategies for engaging in civic participation and civic discourse. The knowledge generated from this session will support the use of the film in classrooms and communities and provide resources for publishing essays, other writings, and projects that are being produced locally and nationally by students.

Planning and Consultative Partners

GSE Faculty:
Dr. Vivian Gadsden, Reading/Writing/Literacy Program; Africana Studies; and Gender, Sexuality, and Women's Studies
Dr. Diane Waff, Director, Philadelphia Writing Project
Dr. Caroline Watts, Director of School and Community Engagement
Dr. Howard Stevenson, Applied Psychology and Human Development; Africana Studies
Dr. Bonnie Botel-Sheppard, Ms. Lara Paparo, Directors, Penn Literacy Network
Africana Studies Faculty:
Dr. Camille Charles, Sociology, Africana Studies, and Education
Dr. Heather A. Williams, Africana Studies
University-wide Programs
Dr. Brian Peterson, Director, Makuu Black Cultural Center
Mr. Edward Epstein, Director, Teachers Institute of Philadelphia (TIP)

Add to Calendar 03/22/2018 4:00 PM 03/22/2018 6:00 PM America/New_York "American Creed" Documentary Screening and Discussion The Philadelphia Writing Project (PhilWP) is located in the Reading/Writing/Literacy Program and the Language, Culture, and International Education Division in the Graduate School of Education. One of the premier sites of the National Writing Project, PhilWP has a 32-year history as a teacher network collaborating with over 800 teacher consultants who work in a variety of ways with teachers and other educators to explore literacy, writing, teaching, and learning in their classrooms and schools. Students and teachers are engaged in discussions about cutting-edge topics that enhance their exposure to critical issues in literary works and in the world. For the University of Pennsylvania Teach-In, PhilWP will air American Creed, a new PBS film, that explores values that underlie American identity and that encourages dialogue across difference. The filming will be followed by a workshop session, facilitated by Dr. Vivian Gadsden, and will include public school students from the Philly School Media Network (Henry C. Lea, George Washington Carver, U School, and Youth Build) and the Philadelphia Public School Notebook. Penn faculty, graduate students, K-12 teachers, and Philadelphia students will be invited to discuss issues raised in the film and co-construct knowledge and strategies for engaging in civic participation and civic discourse. The knowledge generated from this session will support the use of the film in classrooms and communities and provide resources for publishing essays, other writings, and projects that are being produced locally and nationally by students Location TBD

Finale
The University and the Community

Content TBD

Add to Calendar 03/22/2018 4:30 PM 03/22/2018 5:30 PM America/New_York Finale: The University and the Community Content TBD Location TBD

Closing Reception
Detail TBD

Content TBD

Add to Calendar 03/22/2018 5:30 PM 03/22/2018 6:00 PM America/New_York Closing Reception Content TBD Location TBD

Blade Runner
Blade Runner - Final Cut (2007)
Bioethics Film Festival

The Department of Medical Ethics and Health Policy of the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine will host its third annual Bioethics Film Festival, Frankenstein, March 20-22.

The screening of "Blade Runner" – Final Cut (1982, re-released 2007 | 1h 57m) will begin at 6 pm, and will be preceded by a reception. In addition to the screening there will be a panel discussion of the film with Penn faculty and guests.

This year's other films are "The Bride of Frankenstein" (1935) on March 20, and "Blade Runner" – Final Cut (1982, re-released 2007) on March 22.

5:30pm – Reception
6:00pm – Blade Runner (1974)

Moderator:
Dominic Sisti (Penn Department of Medical Ethics and Health Policy)

Discussants:
Stephanie Dick (Penn Department of History and Sociology of Science)
Michael Swanwick (Award-winning author of science fiction books & short stories)

Add to Calendar 03/21/2018 5:30 PM 03/21/2018 8:45 PM America/New_York Blade Runner Final Cut (2007) The screening of "Blade Runner" – Final Cut (1982, re-released 2007 | 1h 57m) will begin at 6 pm, and will be preceded by a reception. In addition to the screening there will be a panel discussion of the film with Penn faculty and guests. International House, Ibrahim Theater, 3701 Chestnut St

Sponsors & Partners

Dedicated to Knowledge and Teach-In 2018