Events



Fall 2011

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Teaching Anthropology (and Anthropologically) Outside of an Anthropology Department

Professor Fran Barg,School of Medicine and Anthropology, and Professor Kathy Hall, School of Education and Anthropology

Wednesday, December 7 | 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Beth Hallowell, CTL Graduate Fellow, Anthropology

Location: Museum 328

Summary: In today’s competitive job market, graduate students increasingly seek teaching jobs outside of traditional departments – for example, in novel interdisciplinary programs and rapidly growing professional schools. While these settings provide unique teaching opportunities, they also present new kinds of classroom challenges. In this workshop, we will discuss what it means to teach anthropology outside of an anthropology department, and how to bring anthropological graduate training to bear on non-anthropological course material. Although we will focus on bringing anthropological expertise and training to new classroom spaces, this workshop will be useful to anyone who is interested in bringing their own disciplinary expertise and graduate training to a larger audience.

All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Anthropology department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Crafting your own lecture - and improving it for the next time

Professor Jessica Stanton, Political Science

Wednesday, December 7 | 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Rosella Cappella, CTL Graduate Fellow, Political Science

Location: Stiteler Hall, Silverstein Forum

Summary: All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Political Science department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Teaching By Writing: Reflections from Two Textbook Authors

Professors Bob Stine and Dean Foster, Statistics Department

Monday, December 5 | 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Emil Pitkin, CTL Graduate Fellow, Statistics

Location: Huntsman Hall 440

Summary: Professors Stine and Foster, authors of a popular statistics textbook, will offer their thoughts on the creation of apt written materials for teaching purposes.

All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Statistics department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Gendered Language and Language Instruction

Professor Anne Pomerantz, Education, Dr. Kathryn McMahon, Director of French Language Program, and Kate Aid, Comparative Literature

Wednesday, November 30 | 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Jos Lavery, CTL Graduate Fellow, Comparative Literature

Location: Cherpack Lounge, 543 Williams Hall

Summary: All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Comparative Literature department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Engineering Faculty Teaching Forum: Creating Effective Exams

Professors Sampath Kannan, Computer and Information Science, and Dan Lee, Electrical and Systems Engineering

Tuesday, November 29 | 12:00 pm - 1:15 pm

Faculty Events

Location: Towne 108

Summary: The Engineering Faculty Teaching Forum brings together faculty from across SEAS for informal conversations about teaching. Each discussion focuses on a different theme and is moderated by two faculty members. All faculty, from experienced to novice teachers, are invited to participate. To encourage open discussion, registration is limited twelve faculty.
The Center for Teaching and Learning provides lunch for all those who register in advance.

Teaching Religion Outside of Religious Studies: Curricular and Pedagogical Opportunities

Professor Liliane Weissberg, German and Comparative Literature, and Professor Ilya Vinitsky, Slavic Languages and Literatures

Monday, November 21 | 4:30 pm - 6:00 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Dan DiMassa, CTL Graduate Fellow, German

Location: Max Kade Center, 3401 Walnut, Room 329A

Summary: When Benjamin Franklin set out to establish the Public Academy of Philadelphia in the 1740s, it was set to be the first of its kind; until that point, the only American colleges in existence functioned as centers of divinity education. In 2011, of course, Franklin’s secular model has become the norm. Nonetheless, the last decade has witnessed a reemergence of interest in religion, which has affected the development of humanities curricula at institutions like Penn. In this workshop, we will explore both curricular and pedagogical approaches to religion: how can the trend toward religion be incorporated into humanities courses and, perhaps, even serve as a marketing tool for our courses? And, moreover, what challenges does the teaching of religion pose for instructors? Liliane Weissberg, professor of German and comparative literature, and Ilya Vinitsky, associate professor of Slavic, will lead our session. Dr. Weissberg has taught courses on German-Jewish connections, Freud, and the supernatural and fantastical, while Dr. Vinitsky has taught courses on mysticism and the supernatural.

All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the German department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Moving Beyond the Anecdote: Using Multi-media to Foster Discussion

Professor Jonathan Moreno, History and Sociology of Science

Wednesday, November 16 | 12:30 pm - 2:00 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Meggie Crnic, CTL Graduate Fellow, HSS

Location: Claudia Cohen Hall 392

Summary: When posing philosophical and bio-ethical questions in the classroom, discussions can quickly verge into students’ personal thoughts and experiences, and get stuck there. This session will explore how to utilize videos, current events, and other multi-media as a way to foster discussion and deepen analysis, particularly surrounding topics in bio-ethics. We will discuss how we can use these techniques in history, STS, and other courses as a way to help students engage with topics related to ethical questions.

All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the History and Sociology of Science department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Faculty-to-Faculty Lunch: Using in-Class Group Work Effectively

Professors Jamal Elias, Religious Studies, and Salamishah Tillet, English

Wednesday, November 16 | 12:00 pm - 1:15 pm

Faculty Events

Location: Cohen Hall 104

Summary: Faculty-to-Faculty Lunches are opportunities for small groups of faculty to get together for informal conversation about teaching-related issues. Each lunch focuses on a different theme and is moderated two faculty members, who will guide the discussion and share their experiences. To encourage interactive discussion, registration is limited to twelve faculty.
The Center for Teaching and Learning provides lunch for all those who register in advance.

Balancing Research and Teaching

Professor Cynthia Damon, Classical Studies

Tuesday, November 15 | 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Jen Gerrish, CTL Graduate Fellow, Classical Studies

Location: Cohen Hall 251 (2nd Floor Classics Lounge)

Summary: All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Classical Studies department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Conversation on Teaching Nursing: Providing Students with Feedback in the Clinical Setting

Monday, November 14 | 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm

Faculty Events

Location: Fagin Hall 213

Summary: Conversations on Teaching Nursing are opportunities for Nursing faculty to come together for interactive discussions about teaching. Facilitated by Center for Teaching and Learning staff, each session focuses on a different theme and will offer faculty the opportunity to share and reflect upon the ideas and experiences of colleagues. All faculty, from experienced to novice teachers, are invited to participate. Lunch is provided for those who register in advance.

Teaching Science Seminar: How to Use Class Time Most Effectively

Thursday, November 10 | 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Faculty Events

Location: Cohen Hall 104

Summary: The Teaching Science Seminar brings together a small group of faculty for regular conversations about teaching science at Penn. Each session will focus on a particular topic, with the specific topic determined by the interests of participating faculty. Core members of the seminar will take part in the series regularly, but other faculty are also welcome to participate in individual discussions. To encourage interactive discussion, registration is limited to twelve faculty.
The Center for Teaching and Learning provides lunch for those who register in advance.

Teaching Theory

Professors Eric Jarosinski, Department of German and David Kazanjian Department of English

Wednesday, November 9 | 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Location: Faculty Lounge 135 Fisher Bennett Hall

Summary: Does CompLit have, need, or want its own pedagogy – and, if so, does the so-called “theory canon” offer a way of thinking about it? After cultural studies has become the norm of many literature departments, and the frantic Francophilic theory of the 1980s has receded, is there any point in the standard “Intro. to Literary Theory” course, either for graduate or undergraduate students? What accounts of interpretation, history and signification does the existing canon privilege, and how can teachers challenge that arrangement without shortchanging students or undermining the valuable work theoretical texts still inculcate? How to deal with the still highly-oppositional discursive practices common to theoretical readings in a University increasingly hostile to humanist inquiry and progressive political work? The workshop will deal with these larger questions, as well as posing some granular, practical problems: how to lead discussion of a difficult text; how to balance a syllabus; how to prepare undergraduates for research, and how to train graduate students for a dissertation.

Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Engineering Faculty Teaching Forum: Connecting Your Course to the Real World: What Do Undergraduate Engineers Need to Know?

Professors Brian Litt, Bioengineering and Neurology, and Steve Zdancewic, Computer and Information Science

Monday, November 7 | 12:00 pm - 1:15 pm

Faculty Events

Location: Levine 307

Summary: The Engineering Faculty Teaching Forum brings together faculty from across SEAS for informal conversations about teaching. Each discussion focuses on a different theme and is moderated by two faculty members. All faculty, from experienced to novice teachers, are invited to participate. To encourage open discussion, registration is limited twelve faculty.
The Center for Teaching and Learning provides lunch for all those who register in advance.

Grading Essays

Professors Zachary Lesser and Chi-Ming Yang

Thursday, November 3 | 5:30 pm - 7:00 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Location: Fisher-Bennett Hall 330 (English Graduate Student Lounge)

Summary: This workshop will offer graduate students an opportunity to discuss efficient and effective strategies for assessing students’ written work—from line-by-line comments to a paragraph of overall feedback on the last page of an essay to in-person meetings and beyond. We will focus on the purpose(s) of grading and the difficulties associated with grading written work fairly. The workshop will also address the challenge of balancing quantitative with qualitative evaluation.

All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the English department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Teaching for Student Comprehension

Professor Bob Hornik, Communication

Monday, October 31 | 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Tara Liss-Mariño, CTL Graduate Fellow, Communication

Location: Annenberg 300

Summary: All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Annenberg School for Communication school and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Teaching a Summer Course in Statistics

Adam Kapelner, PhD candidate, Statistics

Monday, October 31 | 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Emil Pitkin, CTL Graduate Fellow, Statistics

Location: Hunstman Hall 440

Summary: All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Statistics department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Teaching (Against) the Literary Period

Professor Paul Saint-Amour, English

Wednesday, October 26 | 4:30 pm - 6:00 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Joseph Lavery, CTL Graduate Fellow, Comparative Literature

Location: Cherpack Lounge, 543 Williams Hall

Summary: All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Comparative Literature department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Junior Faculty Teaching Forum: Strategies for Managing Your Time While Teaching

Professors Benjamin Pierce, Computer and Information Science, and Beth Winkelstein, Bioengineering

Wednesday, October 26 | 12:00 pm - 1:15 pm

Faculty Events

Location: Levine 315

Summary: Designed for junior Engineering faculty, the Junior Faculty Teaching Forum provides for structured discussion on teaching topics of particular relevance for junior faculty. Each conversation focuses on a different theme and gives participants the chance to hear from senior colleagues who help to moderate the session. To encourage discussion, registration is limited twelve faculty.
The Center for Teaching and Learning provides lunch for all those who register in advance.

Teaching an Introductory Physics Course

Professors Gary Bernstein, Mirjam Cvetic, and Jay Kikkawa

Wednesday, October 26 | 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Megan Potteiger, CTL Senior Fellow

Location: David Rittenhouse Laboratories(DRL) 2N36

Summary:

Faculty-to-Faculty Lunch: Teaching Effectively with TAs

Professors Lee Cassenelli, History, and Karen Detlefsen, Philosophy

Tuesday, October 25 | 12:00 pm - 1:15 pm

Faculty Events

Location: Cohen Hall 104

Summary: Faculty-to-Faculty Lunches are opportunities for small groups of faculty to get together for informal conversation about teaching-related issues. Each lunch focuses on a different theme and is moderated two faculty members, who will guide the discussion and share their experiences. To encourage interactive discussion, registration is limited to twelve faculty.
The Center for Teaching and Learning provides lunch for all those who register in advance.

What to Do as a TA to Prepare to Be a Professor: Thinking about Teaching for the Job Market

Professor Rogers Smith, Political Science

Monday, October 24 | 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Rosella Cappella, CTL Graduate Fellow, Political Science

Location: Stiteler Hall, Silverstein Forum

Summary: All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Political Science department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Conversation on Teaching Nursing: Teaching Traditional and Accelerated Students Together

Monday, October 24 | 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm

Faculty Events

Location: Fagin Hall 213

Summary: Conversations on Teaching Nursing are opportunities for Nursing faculty to come together for interactive discussions about teaching. Facilitated by Center for Teaching and Learning staff, each session focuses on a different theme and will offer faculty the opportunity to share and reflect upon the ideas and experiences of colleagues. All faculty, from experienced to novice teachers, are invited to participate. Lunch is provided for those who register in advance.

Teaching and Your First (Liberal Arts) Job

Professor Christy Schuetze, Sociology and Anthropology, Swarthmore College

Friday, October 21 | 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Beth Hallowell, CTL Graduate Fellow, Anthropology

Location: Museum 327

Summary: All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Anthropology department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Making Group Work Work

Rachel Guberman, CTL Graduate Fellow, History

Thursday, October 20 | 11:00 pm - 12:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Location: Graduate Student Center 305

Summary: Done well, group work can be one of the most effective ways to engage students and promote learning in the classroom. However, many instructors are hesitant to try it because of bad experiences in the past. This workshop will focus on making group work an effective learning tool by asking: What makes in-class group work successful? What challenges does it pose, and what are some ways to address them? We will discuss successful group work strategies, troubleshoot common problems, and develop concrete exercises to use in your classes.

Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate. Also counts as a follow-up workshop for SAS participants in TA Training.

"Teachable Moments": Turning Awkward Teaching Situations into Learning Opportunities

Professor Mark Adams, History and Sociology of Science

Thursday, October 20 | 4:30 pm - 6:00 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Meggie Crnic, CTL Graduate Fellow, HSS

Location: Claudia Cohen Hall room 237

Summary: Unsuitable rooms, technical glitches, silent classrooms, grade grubbing, no-shows, exceptions, whining, late papers? Even the best of courses are bedeviled by unwelcome surprises, difficult encounters, and awkward situations. This session is dedicated to discussing ways of handling such situations, taking advantage of them, and turning them around. With almost half a century of teaching experience, Professor Adams will share the lessons he has learned, and then lay out some actual past scenarios for discussion. Come ready to talk about difficulties you have encountered or are encountering, and to brainstorm effective ways of dealing with them.

All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the HSS department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Teaching Science Seminar: Assessing Students

Thursday, October 20 | 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Faculty Events

Location: Cohen Hall 104

Summary: The Teaching Science Seminar brings together a small group of faculty for regular conversations about teaching science at Penn. Each session will focus on a particular topic, with the specific topic determined by the interests of participating faculty. Core members of the seminar will take part in the series regularly, but other faculty are also welcome to participate in individual discussions. To encourage interactive discussion, registration is limited to twelve faculty.
The Center for Teaching and Learning provides lunch for those who register in advance.

Improving Your Teaching with Student Evaluations

Dan DiMassa, CTL Graduate Fellow, Germanic Languages and Literatures

Wednesday, October 19 | 3:30 pm - 5:00 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Location: Graduate Student Center 305

Summary: During the semester, your students can be a valuable resource for improving your teaching. Because they see you on a regular basis, they already have clear opinions of your strengths and weaknesses and what you might do to help them learn. In this workshop, we’ll explore the use of mid-semester evaluations; formulate evaluation questions based on your class and concerns; and, finally, discuss how we might best interpret student feedback (which can be contradictory) and use it to enhance teaching.

Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate. Also counts as a follow-up workshop for SAS participants in TA Training.

Beyond Plug and Chug: Getting Students to Focus on the Process, Not the Answer

Emil Pitkin, CTL Graduate Fellow, Statistics

Tuesday, October 18 | 4:00 pm - 5:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Location: Graduate Student Center 305

Summary: With a problem set due in three days, the TA can be tempted to coach his students only in the mechanics of the problems from that week’s assignment. Such an approach is necessary but not sufficient for the students to derive long-lasting value from the course. In this workshop we will discuss how to structure assignments and how to instruct students — in and out of recitation — so that their education can be a process of discovery, rather than only completion. To do so, this workshop will help participants consider ways of helping students to understand how to think about problems, not just how to follow a set of rules.

Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate. Also counts as a follow-up workshop for SAS participants in TA Training.

Preparing and Delivering Undergraduate Lectures

Professor Jeremy McInerney, Classical Studies

Tuesday, October 18 | 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Jen Gerrish, CTL Graduate Fellow, Classical Studies

Location: Cohen Hall 251 (2nd Floor Classics Lounge)

Summary: All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Classical Studies department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Teaching Students How to Get Ready for Class and Exams

Rosella Cappella, CTL Graduate Fellow, Political Science

Monday, October 17 | 4:00 pm - 5:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Location: Graduate Student Center 305

Summary: We often think that preparing our students for an exam starts the week before with a review. This workshop will help you think about what you can do from the first week of class to the day of the exam. It will also help you think about what assumptions we make about our students; do your students know how to study? Do they know how to write an essay? What is the best way to prepare students so as to minimize their anxiety in the days before the exam? This workshop will help improve the efficiency and effectiveness of how your students study, and in the process reduce the demands on your time when the next exam approaches.

Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate. Also counts as a follow-up workshop for SAS participants in TA Training.

Navigating Issues of Academic Integrity

Professor Christina Frei, German

Monday, October 17 | 4:00 pm - 5:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Dan DiMassa, CTL Graduate Fellow, German

Location: Max Kade Center, 3401 Walnut, Room 329A

Summary: All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the German department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Giving Students Feedback

Tara Liss-Mariño, CTL Graduate Fellow, Communication

Thursday, October 13 | 12:30 pm - 2:00 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Location: Graduate Student Center 305

Summary: What does it mean to provide students with useful written feedback? What are your teaching goals (or your professor’s teaching goals) and how can you use them to inform the way that you comment on student work? This workshop will provide a forum for considering these questions and will focus on both the content of constructive feedback as well as the process of generating it. Participants will have an opportunity to explore their own grading styles and consider new strategies for using written feedback to enhance student learning.

Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate. Also counts as a follow-up workshop for SAS participants in TA Training.

Planning for Productive Discussions

Professor Warren Breckman, History

Thursday, October 13 | 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Rachel Guberman, CTL Graduate Fellow, History

Location: College Hall 214 (History grad lounge)

Summary: All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the History department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

What to Do with Your Silent Classroom

Beth Hallowell, CTL Graduate Fellow, Anthropology

Wednesday, October 12 | 5:00 pm - 6:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Location: Graduate Student Center 305

Summary: What do you do when you open the floor to questions and your students just sit there staring back at you? Have you ever tried to start a discussion, only to be met with silence? The silent classroom is a challenge that many TAs face, whether they are trying to lead a discussion, review for an exam, or help students through a problem set. In this workshop, we will explore some of the reasons why a classroom might be silent and develop strategies to foster student participation.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate. Also counts as a follow-up workshop for SAS participants in TA Training.

Hands-On Learning: Tapping into the Library’s Material Resources

Professor Toni Bowers, English & Dr. John Pollack, Public Services Specialist, Rare Book & Manuscript Library, Van Pelt Library

Wednesday, October 12 | 1:15 pm - 2:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Claire Bourne, CTL Graduate Fellow, English

Location: Fisher-Bennett Hall 330

Summary: This workshop will offer a forum for professors, graduate students, and librarians to share pedagogical models that integrate Penn’s rich library collections into classroom work and discussion. It will also interrogate the value of incorporating instruction on research methods into literature courses at any level.

All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the English department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Teaching Hot Button Topics: Race and Sexuality

Professor Katherine Sender, Communication & Professor John Jackson, Communication and Anthropology

Monday, October 10 | 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Tara Liss-Mariño, CTL Graduate Fellow, Communication

Location: Annenberg 225

Summary: All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Annenberg School for Communication and so may be most useful to students in related fields.

Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Gender, Power and Teaching

Professor Deborah Thomas, Anthropology and Africana Studies

Friday, October 7 | 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Beth Hallowell, CTL Graduate Fellow, Anthropology

Location: Museum 328

Summary: How do we manage gendered power dynamics in the academy, both as instructors leading classes and as instructors trying to teach about gender? In this workshop, we will organize our discussion of gender and teaching around two sets of questions. First, we will address gender in the classroom. How do we manage gendered power dynamics between TAs and students? How do we manage these dynamics amongst students themselves? Second, we will address gender in the syllabus. How do we teach canons that do not account for gender? How do we develop syllabi that take gender seriously? How can we move gender away from being a ‘hot button’ topic and towards a common analytic in classroom discussions?

All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Anthropology department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Teaching Controversial Topics

Joseph Lavery, CTL Graduate Fellow, Comparative Literature

Thursday, October 6 | 2:00 pm - 3:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Location: Graduate Student Center 305

Summary: This workshop aims to develop practical strategies for leading students through difficult or challenging topics and provide an opportunity for new teachers to discuss some of the most rewarding and fruitful work that they do. We will consider thoughtful and imaginative ways for broaching controversial topics and develop strategies to reorient a discussion that appears to be running out of control. This workshop will also consider building effective relationships between students and instructors so that students feel comfortable talking in situations where they might prefer not to and instructors feel that students will be able to engage difficult topics in an effective and meaningful way.

Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate. Also counts as a follow-up workshop for SAS participants in TA Training.

Teaching Science Seminar

Thursday, October 6 | 12:00 pm - 1:15 pm

Faculty Events

Location: Cohen Hall 104

Summary: The Teaching Science Seminar brings together a small group of faculty for regular conversations about teaching science at Penn. Each session will focus on a particular topic, with the specific topic determined by the interests of participating faculty. Core members of the seminar will take part in the series regularly, but other faculty are also welcome to participate in individual discussions. To encourage interactive discussion, registration is limited to twelve faculty.
The Center for Teaching and Learning provides lunch for those who register in advance

Managing Your Time While Teaching

Dr. Myrna Cohen, Weingarten Learning Resources Center

Wednesday, October 5 | 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Location: NOTE that starting time has changed!!! Graduate Student Center 305

Summary: How can you balance your own academic goals with your teaching responsibilities? What are the methods for accomplishing short- and long-range tasks while teaching a class or a recitation, holding office hours, and/or grading exams? In this workshop, participants will have an opportunity to explore their own time management styles and take away additional strategies for taking control of their time.

Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate. Also counts as a follow-up workshop for SAS participants in TA Training.

Faculty-to-Faculty Lunch: Teaching through Student Film Projects

Professors Ann Farnsworth-Alvear, History, and Zachary Lesser, English

Wednesday, October 5 | 12:00 pm - 1:15 pm

Faculty Events

Location: Cohen Hall 104

Summary: Faculty-to-Faculty Lunches are opportunities for small groups of faculty to get together for informal conversation about teaching-related issues. Each lunch focuses on a different theme and is moderated two faculty members, who will guide the discussion and share their experiences. To encourage interactive discussion, registration is limited to twelve faculty.
The Center for Teaching and Learning provides lunch for all those who register in advance.

Lesson Planning for Discussion

Claire Bourne, CTL Graduate Fellow, English

Tuesday, October 4 | 11:30 pm - 1:00 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Location: Graduate Student Center 305

Summary: Classroom discussion is the cornerstone of many courses across the disciplines, and facilitating discussion is among the key responsibilities of graduate teaching assistants. In this workshop, we will explore strategies for harnessing the potential of discussion to further the objectives of the courses we teach or the recitations we lead. We will ask what the goals of in-class discussion are—or should be—and explore how planning ahead can help us achieve those goals. To this end, the workshop will address the following questions: What types of questions are most effective for generating conversation or debate? How can we format discussions to facilitate student learning? What is the role of the instructor in classroom discussion?

Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate. Also counts as a follow-up workshop for SAS participants in TA Training.

Working with Difficult Students

Jen Gerrish, CTL Graduate Fellow, Classical Studies

Monday, October 3 | 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Location: Graduate Student Center 305

Summary: In this workshop we will develop methods for working with difficult students: those who care too little, those who care too much, and those who present other challenges for you in (and out of) the classroom. We will discuss managing classroom dynamics, setting boundaries, and handling tensions that arise from grading. In addition to developing strategies for handling conflicts with students when they do arise, we will also discuss ways to prevent these problems in future courses.

Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate. Also counts as a follow-up workshop for SAS participants in TA Training.

Helping Students Read Academic Texts in Your Field

Meggie Crnic, CTL Graduate Fellow, History and Sociology of Science

Thursday, September 29 | 3:30 pm - 5:00 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Location: Graduate Student Center 305

Summary: As graduate students, reading academic texts is a skill we have developed over many years; yet the undergraduates in our courses may be encountering academic textbooks, articles, or monographs for the first time. Students may struggle to determine what is important, how they should connect readings with lectures and coursework, and what they should take away from a reading assignment. This workshop will provide you with tools and strategies for helping students learn to read academic texts across disciplines, including developing note-taking strategies, helping students discover what is critical and interesting in a text, and how to work with students who aren’t completing the readings each week.

Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate. Also counts as a follow-up workshop for SAS participants in TA Training.

Technology and New Media in the Classroom

Professor Ralph Rosen, Classical Studies

Tuesday, September 27 | 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Jen Gerrish, CTL Graduate Fellow, Classical Studies

Location: Cohen Hall 251 (2nd Floor Classics Lounge)

Summary: All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Classical Studies department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Defining Your Role as a TA

Megan Potteiger, CTL Senior Graduate Fellow

Monday, September 26 | 2:00 pm - 3:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Location: Graduate Student Center 305

Summary: As teaching assistants we have a unique role in the scheme of undergraduate education. Not long ago we were in our students’ position, yet now we are the ones holding office hours, leading discussions or recitations, and assigning the ever-important grade. In this workshop we will explore what it means to be a TA at Penn, specifically looking at how to establish an effective classroom environment while also developing good working relationships with professors and students.

Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate. Also counts as a follow-up workshop for SAS participants in TA Training.

The Classroom as a "Safe Space"

Professor Heather Love, English

Wednesday, September 21 | 5:00 pm - 6:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Claire Bourne, CTL Graduate Fellow, English

Location: Fisher Bennet Hall 330 (English Graduate Lounge)

Summary: This workshop will explore the idea of the classroom as a “safe space” through candid conversation about how to introduce and facilitate discussions of gender, race, class, violence, trauma, and other sensitive subject matter in the undergraduate classroom. It will also address how to handle sensitive issues in courses that do not take one or more of these issues as a primary focus.

All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the English department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Teaching Outside Your Field

Professors Lee Cassanelli and Jessica Goldberg, History

Tuesday, September 20 | 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Rachel Guberman, CTL Graduate Fellow, History

Location: College Hall 209

Summary: We all dream of teaching our pet topic to a room full of rapt undergrads. But what happens when it feels like you know almost as little about the course material as your students? Both as TAs and as faculty, many of us will be called upon to teach courses that are outside our own fields of expertise. In this workshop we’ll discuss tips and strategies for successfully teaching beyond your comfort zone and get advice from faculty who have been there themselves and have mentored grad students through what can be a nerve wracking, but ultimately rewarding, experience.

All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the History department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

The Art of Teaching Statistics Through Office Hours

Professor Mark Low, Statistics

Tuesday, September 20 | 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Emil Pitkin, CTL Graduate Fellow, Statistics

Location: Huntsman Hall 440 (Statistics Department Conference Room)

Summary: All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Statistics department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Using Technology in the Language Classroom

Dr. Ed Dixon, Germanic Languages and Literatures & Penn Language Center

Monday, September 19 | 4:30 pm - 6:00 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Dan DiMassa, CTL Graduate Fellow, German

Location: Max Kade Center, 3401 Walnut, Room 329A

Summary: Dr. Ed Dixon is the Technology Director for the Penn Language Center.

All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the German department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.

Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Teaching at the Crossroads of History and Anthropology

Professor John Tresch, History and Sociology of Science

Monday, September 19 | 2:00 pm - 3:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Meggie Crnic, CTL Graduate Fellow, HSS

Location: Claudia Cohen Hall, 3rd floor lounge

Summary: How can we make history interesting and relevant for undergraduates, particularly those who are more anthropologically and sociologically minded? Likewise, how do we bring insights from anthropology and sociology to bear on our historical teaching? This workshop explores these questions. We will discuss the intellectual overlap between anthropology and history of sci/tech/med, and how we can use the tools of both disciplines to help students relate to historical times and texts in new and compelling ways. By the end of this workshop, we will have developed strategies for helping students to think and read like historians, while developing their understanding about the interconnections between the disciplines.

All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the HSS department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.

Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Teaching Penn Undergraduates: What You Should Know To Make You an Effective TA

Dr. Eileen Doherty-Sil, Political Science

Monday, September 12 | 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Rosella Cappella, CTL Graduate Fellow, Political Science

Location: Stiteler Hall, Silverstein Forum

Summary: All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Political Science department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.

Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

TA Training

Friday, September 2 | 9:00 am - 12:45 pm

TA Training

Summary: This three-day program is required of all new TAs in Arts and Sciences, Nursing and Design. It is optional for new Annenberg TAs. All participants must register in advance.
New SAS TAs must also attend at least one in-semester follow-up workshop.

TA Training

Thursday, September 1 | 9:00 am - 4:30 am

TA Training

Summary: This three-day program is required of all new TAs in Arts and Sciences, Nursing and Design. It is optional for new Annenberg TAs. All participants must register in advance.
New SAS TAs must also attend at least one in-semester follow-up workshop.

TA Training

Wednesday, August 31 | 9:00 am - 4:45 am

TA Training

Location: Convene in Cohen 17

Summary: This three-day program is required of all new TAs in Arts and Sciences, Nursing and Design. It is optional for new Annenberg TAs. All participants must register in advance.
New SAS TAs must also attend at least one in-semester follow-up workshop.