Events



Spring 2014

« Previous Semester

Using Debate as a Pedagogical Tool in the Classroom

Professor Gary Hatfield, Philosophy and Ryan Muldoon, Philosophy, Politics and Economics

Friday, April 18 | 2:00 pm - 3:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Lindsey Fiorelli, CTL Graduate Fellow, Philosophy

Location: Claudia Cohen 392

Summary: All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Philosophy department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Fostering Diversity in Engineering Through Pedagogy

Professor Paulo Arratia, Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics

Friday, April 18 | 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Rebecca Pierce, CTL Graduate Fellow, Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics

Location: Raisler Lounge (Towne Room 225)

Summary: All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics program and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

The Challenge of Interactive Teaching

Professor Lyle Unger, Computer and Information Science

Wednesday, April 16 | 12:30 pm - 2:00 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Richard Eisenberg, CTL Graduate Fellow, CIS

Location: Skirkanich 114 (Greenberg Lounge)

Summary: Those of us wishing to have students actively learning in our classes face a constant challenge: how do we balance interactivity with content coverage? Having students work in groups in class, or even just fielding clicker questions, reduces the amount that we can lecture. What’s the optimal mix for students? Come join Prof. Lyle Ungar for a conversation about this tension and some possible ways forward.

Indian food lunch (for real this time!) will be served.

This event is open to the wider university community, though the topic will be of more interest to folks in SEAS. Students and faculty are both encouraged to attend.

Please RSVP for this event using this form: https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/WSWMYWB
(but walk-ins always welcome!)
All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the School of Engineering and Applied Science and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward CTL Teaching Certificate.

Engineering Faculty Teaching Forum:
Incorporating Design into Your Courses

Professors Norm Badler, Computer and Information Science, and Dan Bogen, Bioengineering

Tuesday, April 15 | 12:00 pm - 1:15 pm

Faculty Events

Location: Towne 108

Summary: The Engineering Faculty Teaching Forum brings together faculty from across SEAS for informal conversations about teaching. Each discussion focuses on a different theme and is moderated by two faculty members. All faculty, from experienced to novice teachers, are invited to participate. To encourage open discussion, registration is limited twelve faculty.
The Center for Teaching and Learning provides lunch for all those who register in advance.

Faculty-to-Faculty Lunch:
When the Going Gets Tough … Encouraging Persistence in Students

Professors Brenda Casper, Biology, and Angela Duckworth, Psychology

Thursday, April 10 | 12:00 pm - 1:15 pm

Faculty Events

Location: Cohen 104

Summary: Faculty-to-Faculty Lunches are opportunities for small groups of faculty to get together for informal conversation about teaching. Each lunch focuses on a different theme and is moderated two faculty members, who will guide the discussion and share their experiences. To encourage interactive discussion, registration is limited to twelve faculty.
The Center for Teaching and Learning provides lunch for all those who register in advance.

Teaching Enigmatic Texts in Poetry and Fiction

Professor Nili Gold, Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations

Thursday, April 10 | 12:00 pm - 1:15 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Irene Sibbing Plantholt, CTL Graduate Fellow, NELC

Location: Williams 844

Summary:

Teaching Sensitive Subjects in Classical Studies

Professor, Ralph Rosen, Classics

Thursday, April 10 | 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Jay Lucci, CTL Graduate Fellow, Classics

Location: Classics Lounge, 2nd Floor Claudia Cohen Hall

Summary: All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Classics department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.

Teaching Your First Class

Professor Igor Bargatin, Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics

Monday, April 7 | 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Rebecca Pierce, CTL Graduate Fellow, Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics

Location: Levine 307

Summary: All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics program and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

PowerPoint Pedagogy

Professor Zack Lesser, English

Wednesday, April 2 | 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Bronwyn Wallace, CTL Graduate Fellow, English

Location: English Department Graduate Lounge (FBH 330)

Summary: PowerPoint presentations are often demonized for their redundancy, their incomprehensibility, their failures to communicate – but used effectively, PowerPoint can engage students’ critical attention, enhance a lecture or anchor a discussion, animate close-readings or synthesize historical narratives. In this workshop, Zack Lesser will lead a discussion on the basic principles of pedagogical applications for PowerPoint, and demonstrate his own use of the software and the key features and design elements that can help teachers to address complex material clearly and efficiently.

All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the English department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Beyond Grades: Assessing Students in Letters of Recommendation

Professor Simon Richter, German

Tuesday, April 1 | 3:30 pm - 5:00 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Bridget Swanson, CTL Graduate Fellow, Germanic Languages and Literatures

Location: The Max Kade Center, Room 329 A (3401 Walnut St.)

Summary: Recommendation letters should offer unique insight into the abilities, work habits, and aptitude of applicants; thus, they play a significant role in a variety of admissions processes. But how do you write an effective and appropriate recommendation letter? In this workshop, Professor Simon Richter will discuss:
• the anatomy of a well-written letter of recommendation
• how to link the holistic evaluation of students with recommendations
• how to communicate with students about timely and appropriate methods for obtaining recommendations
• ethical concerns
• resources that can assist in the letter writing process

All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the German department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Teaching with Student Presentations

Bridget Swanson, CTL Graduate Fellow, German

Monday, March 31 | 1:00 pm - 2:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Location: Graduate Student Center 305

Summary: In-class student presentations are a teaching strategy commonly used to increase student engagement, encourage higher order thinking, and evaluate student learning. However, in-class presentations often benefit the presenter more than the audience. In this workshop, we will gauge the value of student presentations and discuss a variety of types of presentations that may offer alternative styles or activities for your classroom. Finally, we will cover concrete strategies that instructors can use to effectively implement in-class presentations in their courses, such as creating productive guidelines that limit the focus and duration of the presentations, encouraging audience participation, and connecting the presented material to larger class activities and discussions.
All graduate students are welcome. Counts towards CTL Teaching Certificate.

Teaching Texts in Translation

Professor Joseph Lowry, Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations

Monday, March 31 | 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Irene Sibbing Plantholt, CTL Graduate Fellow, NELC

Location: Williams 816

Summary: All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the NELC department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Setting Students Up to Write Well: Creating Assignments and Grading Standards that Improve Writing

Andrew Mcaninch, Philosophy

Friday, March 28 | 2:00 pm - 3:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Lindsey Fiorelli, CTL Graduate Fellow, Philosophy

Location: Claudia Cohen 392

Summary: All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Philosophy department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

USING THE NEWS: SUCCESSFUL TEACHING WITH CURRENT EVENTS

Irene Plantholt, CTL Graduate Fellow, Near Eastern Languages and Cultures

Thursday, March 27 | 3:00 pm - 4:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Location: Graduate Student Center 305

Summary: All graduate students are welcome. Counts towards CTL Teaching Certificate.

Faculty-to-Faculty Lunch:
Mentoring Undergraduate Students in Lab

Professors Ayelet Ruscio, Psychology, and Masao Sako, Physics and Astronomy

Wednesday, March 26 | 12:00 pm - 1:15 pm

Faculty Events

Location: Cohen 104

Summary: Faculty-to-Faculty Lunches are opportunities for small groups of faculty to get together for informal conversation about teaching. Each lunch focuses on a different theme and is moderated two faculty members, who will guide the discussion and share their experiences. To encourage interactive discussion, registration is limited to twelve faculty.
The Center for Teaching and Learning provides lunch for all those who register in advance.

Reflections on the First Year of Teaching

Dr. Leah Comeau, Assistant Professor of Religion, University of the Sciences

Thursday, March 20 | 3:00 pm - 4:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Rose Muravchick, CTL Graduate Fellow, Religious Studies

Location: Cohen 204

Summary: All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Religious Studies department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

NOTE LOCATION: Using Course Management Systems and Websites to Teach in Grad Student Center

Professor Daniel Singer, Philosophy

Thursday, March 20 | 1:00 pm - 3:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Lindsey Fiorelli, CTL Graduate Fellow, Philosophy

Location: Graduate Student Center 205 (Second floor conference room)

Summary: All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Philosophy department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Teaching Outside Your Field

Professor Xiaojue Wang, East Asian Languages and Civilizations

Wednesday, March 19 | 3:00 pm - 4:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Sarah Nicolazzo, CTL Graduate Fellow, Comparative Literature

Location: Williams 816

Summary: All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Comparative Literature program and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Innovative Multimedia Assignments

Jay Lucci, CTL Graduate Fellow, Classics

Wednesday, March 19 | 11:00 am - 12:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Location: Graduate Student Center 305

Summary: Videos, blogs, maps, podcasts: whatever your discipline, multimedia assignments offer terrific possibilities for creative student work. But if you don’t have a tech background, designing and implementing them can seem daunting. Or you may be worried that, while fun for students, these projects won’t add real value to your teaching. In this workshop we’ll talk about what moving beyond the standard paper or lab report can do for you. We’ll also get into the nitty gritty of designing an assignment that works for your class, managing the technology, and grading the final product.

All graduate students are welcome. Counts towards CTL Teaching Certificate.

Active Learning in the Engineering Classroom

Professor Bruce Kothmann, Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics

Tuesday, March 18 | 4:30 pm - 6:00 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Rebecca Pierce, CTL Graduate Fellow, Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics

Location: Levine 307

Summary: All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the MEAM department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Using Peer Review

Sarah Nicolazzo, CTL Graduate Fellow, Comparative Literature

Tuesday, March 18 | 3:00 pm - 4:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Location: Graduate Student Center 305

Summary: Unique pedagogical opportunities arise when students read and respond to each other’s work. At its best, peer review can transform a course into a truly collaborative and fully participatory endeavor. However, It also poses risks, as anxiety, competition, or the fear of embarrassment can render the benefits of peer review inaccessible to many students, especially if the class is not properly prepared. Successful peer review requires students develop specific skills and that instructors create clear guidelines. In this workshop, we’ll learn how to structure and conduct successful peer review assignments and activities, focusing on how to teach students the skills they need to respond productively to the work of their peers and how to integrate peer review into the broader themes and skills covered by the course. Our discussion will also cover common pitfalls and what to do if they happen.
All graduate students are welcome. Counts towards CTL Teaching Certificate.

The Socratic Method: Teaching by Asking Instead of Telling

Professor Tess Wilkinson-Ryan (Law and Psychology) & Professor Stephen Morse (Psychology and Law in Psychiatry; Associate Director, Center for Neuroscience & Society)

Tuesday, March 18 | 2:00 pm - 3:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Tanya Weerakkody, CTL Graduate Fellow, Neuroscience

Location: Stemmler 215

Summary: All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Neuroscience program and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Designing Your Own Course

Professors Joseph Wegner and Jennifer Houser Wegner, Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations

Monday, March 17 | 12:00 pm - 1:15 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Irene Sibbing Plantholt, CTL Graduate Fellow, NELC

Location: Williams 816

Summary: All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the NELC department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Structuring Learning in Large Classes

Professor CJ Taylor, Computer and Information Science

Monday, March 17 | 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Richard Eisenberg, CTL Graduate Fellow, CIS

Location: Levine 307

Summary: Learning is an individual phenomenon, and thus students often find that the personal attention they get in smaller classes helps them to grasp the concepts better and perform at a higher level. Yet, given the realities of teaching in a research university, it is often necessary to hold large classes where individual attention is harder to come by. Come join Prof. CJ Taylor in a discussion about how to foster good student learning even in the setting of a large course.
Indian food lunch will be served.

This event is open to the wider university community. Students and faculty are both encouraged to attend.

Please RSVP for this event using this form: https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/NCRQXHK
(but walk-ins always welcome!)

All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the CIS department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
This workshop counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

After 'World Religions': New Challenges and Opportunities

Professor Annette Y. Reed, Religious Studies

Thursday, March 6 | 3:00 pm - 4:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Rose Muravchick, CTL Graduate Fellow, Religious Studies

Location: Cohen 204

Summary: All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Religious Studies department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Designing Your Own Course

Richard Eisenberg, CTL Graduate Fellow, Computer and Information Science

Thursday, March 6 | 12:30 pm - 2:00 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Location: Graduate Student Center 305

Summary: This workshop will discuss practical approaches to planning your own course, either designing one from scratch or taking a course that has already been taught in your department and making it your own. We’ll discuss (among other topics) outlining the course, planning out assignments, and choosing an assessment strategy. The workshop will be hands-on; please come with a course in mind from your discipline that you may someday be called on to teach.
All graduate students are welcome. Counts towards CTL Teaching Certificate.

Technology and New Media in the Classical Studies Classroom

Professor Peter Struck, Classics

Thursday, March 6 | 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Jay Lucci, CTL Graduate Fellow, Classics

Location: Classics Lounge, 2nd Floor Claudia Cohen Hall

Summary: All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Classics department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Teaching Writing in the Foreign Language Classroom

Professor Claudia Lynn, German

Tuesday, March 4 | 3:30 pm - 5:00 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Bridget Swanson, CTL Graduate Fellow, Germanic Languages and Literatures

Location: The Max Kade Center, Room 329 A (3401 Walnut St.)

Summary: Meaningful communication is at the heart of foreign language education. Because of this, writing assignments often constitute a core course component. Whereas content and style are key in most native language-based classes, students in foreign language setting face an additional set of challenges: they must demonstrate grammatical control, semantic precision, syntactical accuracy, and stylistic awareness in a language and culture quite literally foreign to them. How can instructors create writing assignments that are level appropriate and meaningful? What strategies can they use to foster the skills students need in order to write effectively and independently? What methods of evaluation best support student progress? In this workshop, language program coordinator Claudia Lynn will discuss how to:

design and scaffold classroom activities for L2 writing create focused and clearly articulated L2 writing prompts provide oral and written feedback select appropriate assessment tools

All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the German department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Engineering Faculty Teaching Forum:
Teaching Mathematically Complex Materials: Making the Abstract Concrete

Professors Santosh Venkatesh, Electrical and Systems Engineering, and Stephanie Weirich, Computer and Information Science

Tuesday, March 4 | 12:00 pm - 1:15 pm

Faculty Events

Location: Towne 108

Summary: The Engineering Faculty Teaching Forum brings together faculty from across SEAS for informal conversations about teaching. Each discussion focuses on a different theme and is moderated by two faculty members. All faculty, from experienced to novice teachers, are invited to participate. To encourage open discussion, registration is limited twelve faculty.
The Center for Teaching and Learning provides lunch for all those who register in advance.

Academic Integrity

Rebecca Pierce, CTL Graduate Fellow, Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics

Monday, March 3 | 11:30 am - 1:00 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Location: Graduate Student Center 205 (Second floor conference room)

Summary: Academic integrity is one of the most important values we can teach our students. However, there is often a disconnect between what instructors expect in terms of integrity and what students do. Many factors can lead a student to intentionally or unintentionally violate a code of academic integrity: from the pressure students feel to earn good grades to the easy access to answers found on the Internet. In this workshop we will discuss what may lead students to violate academic integrity codes and then workshop strategies that educators can use to create a culture that promotes honesty and integrity in their classroom. We will also discuss Penn’s policy for handling academic dishonesty and the options you have if you discover academic integrity violations in your class.
All graduate students are welcome. Counts towards CTL Teaching Certificate.

Effective Assignment Design

Professor Jo Park, English

Wednesday, February 26 | 3:00 pm - 4:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Bronwyn Wallace, CTL Graduate Fellow, English

Location: English Department Graduate Lounge (FBH 330)

Summary: What are we doing when we design assignments? How do course design, classroom pedagogy, and assignment genres inform each other? How do we communicate with our students about the nature of the work we ask them to do outside of class? What skills do we want our students to cultivate, and what kinds of assignment are suited to those skills? This workshop will address these fundamentals of assignment design, including discussion of the range of possible assignments amenable to the development of competency in literary analysis and literary history, practical problems such as how to write effective instructions for assignments, how to integrate assignments with in-class work, and the role of assignments in assessment.

All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the English Department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Teaching Science Through the Lens of Controversial Public Issues

Professor Martha Farah, Psychology

Tuesday, February 25 | 3:30 pm - 5:00 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Tanya Weerakkody, CTL Graduate Fellow, Neuroscience

Location: Stemmler 215

Summary: All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Neuroscience program and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Learning with Museum Objects: Making The Penn Museum Part of Your Course

Professor Steve Tinney (Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations; Deputy Director, Penn Museum) and Dr. Anne Tiballi (Curricular Facilitator, Penn Museum)

Tuesday, February 25 | 12:00 pm - 1:20 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Irene Sibbing Plantholt, CTL Graduate Fellow, NELC

Location: Williams 844

Summary: The Penn museum is an incredibly rich resource on campus, so why wouldn’t we teachers use it? The integration of its art and artifacts into our courses can contribute to interactive learning, student engagement and critical thinking. In this workshop, Professor Steve Tinney and Dr. Anne Tiballi will discuss not only how we can make use of the collections by organizing a tour or a collections study session, but also how to design an object-based course. Such courses should not be limited to disciplines that are directly related to the museum; in fact, this workshop is intended to think about how museum objects can contribute to courses from any department and school.

All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the NELC department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Designing Your Own Syllabus

Professor Karen Detlefsen, Philosophy

Friday, February 21 | 2:00 pm - 3:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Lindsey Fiorelli, CTL Graduate Fellow, Philosophy

Location: Cohen 392

Summary: All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Philosophy department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Faculty-to-Faculty Lunch:
Digital Humanities in the Classroom: Text Mining and Digital Mapping

Professors Amy Hillier, City and Regional Planning, and Heather Love, English

Thursday, February 20 | 12:00 pm - 1:15 pm

Faculty Events

Summary: Faculty-to-Faculty Lunches are opportunities for small groups of faculty to get together for informal conversation about teaching. Each lunch focuses on a different theme and is moderated two faculty members, who will guide the discussion and share their experiences. To encourage interactive discussion, registration is limited to twelve faculty.
The Center for Teaching and Learning provides lunch for all those who register in advance.

From the Classroom to the Page: How to Relate Discussion and Writing

Professor Cam Grey, Classics

Thursday, February 20 | 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Jay Lucci, CTL Graduate Fellow, Classics

Location: Classics Lounge, 2nd Floor Claudia Cohen Hall

Summary: All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Classics department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Out of the Frying Pan: Reflections on Starting Out as a Professor

Professor Joe Devietti, Computer and Information Science

Thursday, February 20 | 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Richard Eisenberg, CTL Graduate Fellow, CIS

Location: Raisler Lounge, Towne 225

Summary: Prof. Joe Devietti will lead a discussion on the first few semesters as a faculty member. Joe joined us in September 2012 after getting his PhD at the University of Washington. He taught a graduate seminar last year and just completed his first run-through of CIS 501: Computer Architecture. Joe will share some of his experiences in preparing and delivering these courses, highlighting some unexpected twists and turns along the way. He will also discuss ways of streamlining preparation and managing the tasks involved with delivering a core course with lots of moving parts.

Active Learning in Large Classes

Tanya Weerakkody, CTL Graduate Fellow, Neuroscience

Wednesday, February 19 | 3:00 pm - 4:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Location: Graduate Student Center 305

Summary: Large-enrollment classrooms predominate introductory course offerings of many colleges and universities. Unfortunately, the traditional lecture-based methods widely used in this context can fail to motivate intellectual engagement. Educators are currently being urged to adopt active strategies that shift classroom emphasis towards student participation and learning. However, both student and instructor adjustment to new learning and teaching paradigms may be a considerable barrier to implementing inquiry-oriented approaches in a large-class setting. This workshop will propose alternatives to uninterrupted lecture to engage students in higher-order thinking tasks and promote self-directed learning. We will further discuss how course materials and classroom technology can be used to complement these practices and circumvent the obstacles of teaching large classes.
All graduate students are welcome. Counts towards CTL Teaching Certificate.

Engineering Faculty Teaching Forum:
Putting Together a New Course

Professors Chris Fang-Yen, Bioengineering, and Zack Ives, Computer and Information Science

Tuesday, February 18 | 12:00 pm - 1:15 pm

Faculty Events

Location: Towne 108

Summary: The Engineering Faculty Teaching Forum brings together faculty from across SEAS for informal conversations about teaching. Each discussion focuses on a different theme and is moderated by two faculty members. All faculty, from experienced to novice teachers, are invited to participate. To encourage open discussion, registration is limited twelve faculty.
The Center for Teaching and Learning provides lunch for all those who register in advance.

Teaching Students to Read Critically

Lindsey Fiorelli, CTL Graduate Fellow, Philosophy

Monday, February 17 | 2:30 pm - 4:00 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Location: Graduate Student Center 305

Summary: How can we teach our students to be critically engaged with a text during recitation and outside of recitation? To answer this question, this workshop will examine how we engage with texts in our disciplines and what we mean by “critical reading” across disciplines. The workshop will then consider how we can keep students focused on the text in the classroom (via partner work, group work, and big group discussion) and, crucially, get them to read critically outside of the classroom (via in-class activities, writing assignments and canvas/blackboard participation). Finally, we will consider what reading does for students and how it plays a role in reaching our overall classroom goals.
All graduate students are welcome. Counts towards CTL Teaching Certificate.

What is Class Participation?

Bronwyn Wallace, CTL Graduate Fellow, English

Friday, February 14 | 1:00 pm - 2:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Location: Graduate Student Center 305

Summary: Participation is a classroom value that instructors often take for granted. This workshop will examine the assumptions we make about participation and what, exactly, participation teaches. We will discuss the different forms that participation can take, considering ways to engage a diverse range of student participation styles in class. We will also discuss strategies to make the social space of a classroom optimally amenable to participation of all modes from all students. Finally we will ask how can we usefully and fairly assess participation. Throughout, we will explore these questions in the context of our broader pedagogical goals, in order to develop a set of tools for cultivating productive participatory classrooms.
All graduate students are welcome. Counts towards CTL Teaching Certificate.

Who's Afraid of Theory? Helping Students Access Difficult Texts

Dr. Melanie Adley, Associate Director, Gender, Sexuality & Women's Studies

Wednesday, February 12 | 2:30 pm - 4:00 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Sarah Nicolazzo, CTL Graduate Fellow, Comparative Literature

Location: English Department Grad Lounge (330 Fisher-Bennett Hall)

Summary: Join us for a workshop with Melanie Adley, Associate Director of the Gender, Sexuality, and Women’s Studies Program, as she discusses her strategies for helping students access difficult theoretical material in the introductory classroom. We will discuss how to prioritize basic concepts for teaching without letting go of nuance and complexity, how to teach difficult texts in mixed-level classrooms, and how to encourage discussion and engagement, even in large classes. While Melanie will be speaking specifically about her experience teaching theory in her introductory course Gender and Society, we will also discuss the ways that these strategies can help us teach difficult literary texts at the introductory level as well.
All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Comparative Literature program and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Beyond the Kodak Moment: Incorporating Images in Your Teaching

Rose Muravchick, CTL Graduate Fellow, Religious Studies

Thursday, February 6 | 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Location: Graduate Student Center 305

Summary: Incorporating images into your teaching can go far beyond a few photographs in PowerPoint. This workshop will present multiple scenarios for how to incorporate images into your class sessions, activities, assignments, and assessments. By focusing on how images (including charts, diagrams, maps and photographs) can reinforce lecture topics, stimulate discussion, and encourage thoughtful writing, this session will explore a variety of techniques for bringing visuals to life in the classroom. All disciplines are welcome to attend, and topics covered will include how to effectively source and attribute images.

All graduate students are welcome. Counts towards CTL Teaching Certificate.

Engineering Faculty Teaching Forum:
Setting All Students up for Success: Countering Stereotype Threat

Professors Sue Davidson, Computer and Information Science, and David Meaney, Bioengineering

Tuesday, February 4 | 12:00 pm - 1:15 pm

Faculty Events

Location: Towne 108

Summary: The Engineering Faculty Teaching Forum brings together faculty from across SEAS for informal conversations about teaching. Each discussion focuses on a different theme and is moderated by two faculty members. All faculty, from experienced to novice teachers, are invited to participate. To encourage open discussion, registration is limited twelve faculty.
The Center for Teaching and Learning provides lunch for all those who register in advance.

Critically Reading Primary and Secondary Texts in the Classics Classroom

Professor Joe Farrell, Classics

Wednesday, January 29 | 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Jay Lucci, CTL Graduate Fellow, Classics

Location: Classics Lounge, 2nd Floor Claudia Cohen Hall

Summary: This workshop will address the question of how to train students to read critically in a Classical Studies context. We will survey the distinctions between reading primary texts (in their original languages and in translation) and secondary texts (both those which themselves explicate primary sources and those less tied to specific texts), and we will discuss some practical techniques for teaching students to understand and take advantage of these distinctions.

All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Classics department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Teaching With Still and Moving Images

Professors Timothy Corrigan, English, History of Art, and Cinema Studies, and Catriona MacLeod, Germanic Languages and Literatures

Tuesday, January 28 | 3:30 pm - 5:00 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Bridget Swanson, CTL Graduate Fellow, Germanic Languages and Literatures

Location: The Max Kade Center, Room 329 A (3401 Walnut St.)

Summary: With the wide variety of available DVDs, the easy access of images via the internet, and the rise of social media platforms, images – both still and moving – have become an integral part of contemporary culture. In the classroom, we now teach and expect students to skillfully navigate both literary and visual worlds. Nevertheless, the seductive simplicity of the visual medium can at times mask the methodological challenges of working with images. In this workshop, award-winning Professors Timothy Corrigan and Catriona MacLeod will discuss the challenges and opportunities of teaching with images and will share strategies for effectively integrating visual media into the classroom.

All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the German department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Beyond 'Relevance' : Teaching Historically Distant Material

Professor Rebecca Bushnell, English

Tuesday, January 28 | 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Location: English Department Graduate Lounge (Fisher-Bennett Hall 330)

Summary: Teaching literary texts from a time not our own poses several challenges: how to attend responsibly to their historical specificity, how to help our students to create relationships with texts and cultures that may at first be alienating, and how to help our students to cultivate investments in texts separated from them by a broad historical divide. In this workshop, we will discuss pedagogical approaches to such problems as historical alterity, periodization, the linguistic or formal opacity of early literatures, and the cultural politics of teaching with the past. We will also explore the variety of methodologies available to the literary study of history in the undergraduate classroom.

All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the English department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Teaching Design

Professor Mark Yim, MEAM

Tuesday, January 28 | 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Rebecca Pierce, CTL Graduate Fellow, Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics

Location: Levine 307

Summary: All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the MEAM department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Stereotypes and their Effects on Academic Performance and Evaluation

Professor Joshua Aronson, Applied Psychology, New York University

Thursday, January 23 | 4:45 pm - 6:15 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Richard Eisenberg, CTL Graduate Fellow, Computer and Information Science

Location: Towne 225 (Raisler Lounge)

Summary: Come join invited speaker Joshua Aronson to have a discussion about stereotyping and how it affects enrollment and achievement for all of us, both as potential teachers and as students. This discussion will follow on from Dr. Aronson’s talk, scheduled for 3pm in Wu & Chen Auditorium, though you are welcome to join us even if you can’t make the talk. Dr. Aronson is an associate professor of developmental, social, and educational psychology at NYU. His research focuses on the social and psychological influences on academic achievement. He was among the first researchers to identify and quantify the effects of stereotype threat.
Dinner will be served.
Please RSVP for this event using this form: https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/G6VGH6K
(but walk-ins always welcome!)
All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the School of Engineering and Applied Science and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.